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Tip #9: Turn Down the Thermostat, Mr. President!

by Wendy Gordon According to Sheryl Gay Stolberg of the New York Times, the capital “flew into a bit of a tizzy” when your first photographs in the Oval Office showed you jacket-free and not so buttoned-up as the last President. I was tweeting too but not from your casual style but for cranking up...

by Wendy Gordon

According to Sheryl Gay Stolberg of the New York Times, the capital “flew into a bit of a tizzy” when your first photographs in the Oval Office showed you jacket-free and not so buttoned-up as the last President. I was tweeting too but not from your casual style but for cranking up the thermostat.

Ee-gad, Mr. President, Please don’t do that. I know you’re from Hawaii, but put on a sweater, as Jimmy Carter did, or consider installing a furnace humidifier. You see, it’s really not the heat that matters, it’s the humidity.

A humidifier can help reduce the heat you need to feel comfortable in a room because moist air feels warmer and as such you can feel the same warmth at a lower temperature as long as the humidity is high enough. A 20°C or 69°F temperature at 35% relative humidity feels just as warm as a 22°C or 72°F setting at 19% relative humidity. So install a furnace humidifier, set it for the proper humidity and your thermostat three degrees lower than you would normally. You’ll be comfortable while saving; this small adjustment in temperature will lower your annual heating bills by as much as 5 percent.

For more energy saving tips, check out the Green Guide.

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