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D’oh! So Close!

—Image courtesy NASA/Bill Ingalls Actually, I’m not talking about the space shuttle Discovery, which has been yet again postponed from its planned liftoff, this time to Sunday night. I’m talking about the lush full moon that was shining down on Discovery as it sat on the Florida launch pad on Wednesday, March 11. The moon...

shuttle-moon-friday.jpg

—Image courtesy NASA/Bill Ingalls

Actually, I’m not talking about the space shuttle Discovery, which has been yet again postponed from its planned liftoff, this time to Sunday night.

I’m talking about the lush full moon that was shining down on Discovery as it sat on the Florida launch pad on Wednesday, March 11.

The moon came so close to casting an even eerier light on Friday the 13th, part deux.

In fact, 2009 will get a triple dose of the unlucky day, and this month’s event was hours away from also getting some full moon magic to round out the effect.

Fans of etymology won’t be surprised that we get a full moon roughly once a month—the word “month” is derived from “moon,” and it signifies the time period tied to a full lunar cycle.

But we very rarely get a full moon on a Friday the 13th—the last time it happened was October 13, 2000. The next spooky day will come on June 13, 2014.

If it makes you feel any better, Friday 13, 2009, you do get the dubious honor of being the first “Pluto Day” in the great state of Illinois

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