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Gathering Beneath the Human Family Tree

Genographic Project team colleagues were up in New York’s Queens borough landmark Astoria Park Monday night for an outdoor world premiere screening of The Human Family Tree. The documentary chronicles the globe-spanning ancestry of seven Astoria residents whose cheeks were swabbed on the same day. New York City Councilman Peter Vallone, Jr., welcomed viewers to...

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Genographic Project team colleagues were up in New York’s Queens borough landmark Astoria Park Monday night for an outdoor world premiere screening of The Human Family Tree. The documentary chronicles the globe-spanning ancestry of seven Astoria residents whose cheeks were swabbed on the same day.

New York City Councilman Peter Vallone, Jr., welcomed viewers to the screening with a nod to humanity’s common heritage. “Our ancestors traveled the world, overcame all sorts of hardships and now here we all are, watching this film in Astoria Park. I was part of this project like many of you were, got my DNA swabbed and was here originally when they gave us the results. Now I am here tonight at our extended family reunion.”

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I recently blogged about my Genographic test results. Others who have participated in the Genographic Project via a Public Participation Kit can now see how they’re related to the Astoria residents featured in the special–just check under “See Your Results.” If you haven’t participated but would like to know the migration pathways followed by your ancestors, you can get a test kit here. And you can see more photographs from the world premiere screening on the project’s Genographica blog.</p

The Human Family Tree has its television premiere this Sunday night, August 30, on the National Geographic Channel. I’ll be watching with project leader Spencer Wells. Watch it too if you get the chance, and let me know what you think!

Photographs by Spencer Wells and Carol Marino

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