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The New Green Apple (iPad) Tablet Computer

The much-hyped Apple tablet, called the iPad, was revealed today, and… it may be your greenest option yet if you’re in the market for a tablet computer, e-reader, netbook, or smartbook. At the launch, Apple CEO Steve Jobs pointed out that the iPad, which looks like a larger version of the iPhone, is arsenic free,...

The much-hyped Apple tablet, called the iPad, was revealed today, and… it may be your greenest option yet if you’re in the market for a tablet computer, e-reader, netbook, or smartbook.

At the launch, Apple CEO Steve Jobs pointed out that the iPad, which looks like a larger version of the iPhone, is arsenic free, BFR-free, mercury-free, PVC-free, and highly recyclable. It also has a 10-hour battery life, for now.

For more pictures, check out Macworld and Engadget coverage.

The biggest competition in this category could come from Hewlett-Packard (HP), Dell, and Lenovo, which all announced plans for new tablets at the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Vegas this month. Both HP and Apple have a good reputation in terms of green.

E-readers, netbooks, and smartbooks were all the rage at CES this year, but, with e-waste piling up around the world, Green Guide thinks you should skip right over them and move straight on to tablets, which will likely combine and replace all three technologies within the year.

More from the Green Guide Blog:

Dispatches From the Consumer Electronics Show: 10 Green(ish) Products to Look for in 2010

Computer Buying Guide

–Tasha Eichenseher blog-headshot.jpg

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Meet the Author

Tasha Eichenseher
Tasha Eichenseher is the Environment Producer and Editor for National Geographic Digital Media. She has covered water issues for a wide range of media outlets, including E/The Environment Magazine, Environmental Science & Technology online news, Greenwire, Green Guide, and National Geographic News.