Nat Geo WILD: What Are the Odds? Some Surprising Shark Attack Stats

Who knew toilets and air fresheners could be so dangerous? Well, at least statistically speaking it appears sharks seem to pose less of a threat than many things we encounter every day.

  • In 1996, toilets injured 43,000 Americans. Sharks injured 13.
  • You have a one in 63 chance of dying from the flu and a one in 3,700,000 chance of being killed by a shark.
  • You have a one in 218 chance of dying from a fall and a one in 3.7 million chance of being killed by a shark.
  • 1n 1996, buckets and pails injured almost 11,000 Americans.  Sharks injured 13.
  • In 1996, room fresheners injured 2,600 Americans.  Sharks injured 13.
  • The U.S. averages 19 shark attacks a year.  Lightning kills about 41 people a year in coastal states alone.
  • Since 1959, Florida has had nine shark attack fatalities.  Lightning fatalities = 459.
  • Since 1959, California has had more shark attacks (89) than lightning fatalities (30).
  • Since 1959, California has had more shark attacks (89) than lightning fatalities (30).
  • For every human killed by a shark, humans kill two million sharks.
  • Anyone who has swum in New Smyrna Beach, Florida (shark capital of the world) has likely been within 10 feet of a shark.
  • Some sharks can live for a year without eating, surviving on the oil stored in their livers.

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