National Geographic Society Newsroom

Giant Butter Sculpture Powers Farm for Three Days

The Penn­syl­va­nia Farm Show is host to a thousand-pound work of art – a butter sculpture of a fair queen and a boy leading his calf through a country fair. All that butter will not go to waste after the show ends.  Steve Rein­ford is the lucky dairy farmer who will take cus­tody of the...

The Penn­syl­va­nia Farm Show is host to a thousand-pound work of art – a butter sculpture of a fair queen and a boy leading his calf through a country fair.

All that butter will not go to waste after the show ends.  Steve Rein­ford is the lucky dairy farmer who will take cus­tody of the sculp­ture, dumping the queen, boy and cow into his manure pit.  Far from a tragic end, the sculpture, with a little help from a methane digester, will power Reinford’s home and farm for about three days.   Even without the addition of a butter cow, the digester creates so much energy that Reinford sells the excess electricity back to the grid.

Although the Norwegians, facing a butter shortage crisis and illegal butter-smuggling due to a high-fat diet craze, might prefer that the butter cow simply be shipped directly to them.

For all the latest science news, check out the National Geographic’s twice-weekly news rundown, EarthCurrent.

 

 

About National Geographic Society

The National Geographic Society is a global nonprofit organization that uses the power of science, exploration, education and storytelling to illuminate and protect the wonder of the world. Since 1888, National Geographic has pushed the boundaries of exploration, investing in bold people and transformative ideas, providing more than 14,000 grants for work across all seven continents, reaching 3 million students each year through education offerings, and engaging audiences around the globe through signature experiences, stories and content. To learn more, visit www.nationalgeographic.org or follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.