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Joel Sartore Takes Spectacular Photos to Aspen

One of the best wildlife photographers working today, Joel Sartore has inspired millions with his intimate, colorful images of wildlife from around the world. Sartore will be sharing his photos with an audience next month at the Aspen Environment Forum in Colorado (June 22-25, tickets still available). In addition to shooting eye-catching covers for National Geographic,...

One of the best wildlife photographers working today, Joel Sartore has inspired millions with his intimate, colorful images of wildlife from around the world. Sartore will be sharing his photos with an audience next month at the Aspen Environment Forum in Colorado (June 22-25, tickets still available).

In addition to shooting eye-catching covers for National Geographic, Sartore hopes to document ongoing threats to the natural world. In the below clip, Sartore went on Last Call with Carson Daly to discuss his Biodiversity Project.

Sartore explains that seeing a vintage photo of the world’s last passenger pigeon led him to undertake his challenging project, which seeks to make intimate studio portraits of all 6,000 animals that are in captivity in the United States.

As the “chimp incident” makes clear, the project hasn’t always been smooth sailing, but hopefully Sartore’s lens will shine new light on our tenuous relationship to the Animal Kingdom, and inspire us to be better stewards of the planet.

Check out more of Sartore’s Biodiversity Project and sign up to see and meet him in Aspen. I’ll be there!

 

 

 

Brian Clark Howard is an Environment Writer and Editor at National Geographic News. He previously served as an editor for TheDailyGreen.com and E/The Environmental Magazine, and has written for TheAtlantic.com, FastCompany.com, PopularMechanics.com, Yahoo!, MSN, Miller-McCune and elsewhere. He is the co-author of six books, including Geothermal HVACGreen Lighting and Build Your Own Small Wind Power System.

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