Mike Fay’s Complete Pitcairn Islands Journal

Throughout the month-long Pristine Seas: Pitcairn Islands Expedition, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Mike Fay clambered, climbed, and careened over some of the most remote terrain on Earth. With every step he was recording plant and animal life, gaining local knowledge from a descendent of Bounty mutineer Fletcher Christian, and learning about the environmental factors shaping the island itself and the lives of its inhabitants.

He also recorded his every movement from first arriving on Pitcairn to identifying birds on desert atolls to his epic backwoods hikes upon returning to the expedition’s namesake island, in a series of 20 daily journal entries from the field. You can now experience his entire trek as though you were there through the Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal section of this blog.

 

The Complete Journal Blogroll

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Arrival on Pitcairn

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Mrs. T and Tedside

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: PhDs and Rose Apples

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Giant Fern Discovery and More

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Departure Day

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: UFO Lost at Sea, Stalked by Grey Reef Sharks, and More

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Tragic Sighting

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Rat Patrol

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: “Down Rope”–With a Rope

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Why Are Birds So Beautiful?

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Return to Pitcairn

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Disaster at St. Paul’s

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: The Island’s Magic Gardens

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: School Field Trip & Meeting the Bees

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Slopes, Goats, and Roads

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Fishing in a Homemade Boat

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Archaeology and the Biggest Landslide Yet

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Attack of the Ferns

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: The Big Fish Fry

Mike Fay’s Pitcairn Journal: Final Ascent and Farewell

 

More From the Pitcairn Islands Expedition

Read All Pitcairn Islands Expedition Blogs

Tahiti Photo Gallery

Photos: A World in One Coral

Mike Fay Bio and Other Features

Enric Sala Bio and More

Wildlife

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Mike Fay has spent his life as a naturalist—from the Sierra Nevadas and the Maine woods as a boy, to Alaska and Central America in college, to North Africa and the depths of the central African forest and savannas for the last 25 years. He has worked for the Wildlife Conservation Society of the Bronx since 1991. In 1996, Fay flew over the forests of Congo and Gabon and realized there was a vast, intact forest corridor spanning the two countries from the Oubangui to the Atlantic Ocean. In 1997, he walked the entire corridor, over 2,000 miles, surveying trees, wildlife, and human impacts on 12 uninhabited forest blocks. Called Megatransect, this work led to a historic initiative by the Gabonese government to create a system of 13 national parks, making up some 11,000 square miles (28,500 square kilometers). In 2004, he completed the Megaflyover, an eight-month aerial survey of the entire African continent. He logged 800 hours and took 116,000 vertical images of human impact and associated ecosystems, many of which are now visible on Google Earth. In 2008 Fay completed the Redwood Transect, a new project to learn more about the redwood forest. He walked the entire range of the redwood tree, over 700 miles. Since then he has participated in the 2011 BioBlitz at Saguaro National Park, and is a regular team member of fellow NG Explorer Enric Sala's Pristine Seas Expeditions, recording the life and land above the waves.