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What You Don’t Know About Home Burglaries

Just in time for the return to the big screen of Bilbo Baggins, perhaps the most unlikely of burglars in literature, comes this infographic on home theft. In the book I co-wrote a couple of years ago on lighting (Green Lighting), we took a brief look at the question of whether outside security lights or street lights...

Just in time for the return to the big screen of Bilbo Baggins, perhaps the most unlikely of burglars in literature, comes this infographic on home theft.

In the book I co-wrote a couple of years ago on lighting (Green Lighting), we took a brief look at the question of whether outside security lights or street lights actually decrease crime. We reported that the results are inconclusive, and that experts are divided on the matter, although most seem to think motion-activated lights may help some (they also use less energy).

And so I note with particular interest that, according to this infographic, a whopping 65% of residential burglaries happen during the day. It’s also surprising to me that homes in the suburbs are allegedly 1.5 times more likely to be targeted than homes in urban areas.

This last point gives me some comfort, because I do live in an urban area, with bars on my windows. It does make me wonder if part of the lower rate in urban areas can be attributed to increased security, or whether such measures as window bars are actually not needed.

What do you think?

Home Burglary Infographic

Infographic by Safe Sound Family

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