Human Journey

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #6

Explore the wilderness with us… Within the next 10-15 years we will see the last-remaining wilderness area on earth dominated by the demands of growing human populations and undermined by accelerated climate change. When the earth’s last wild places are gone, all we will have are fenced off protected areas dependent on constant intervention to persist and marginalized by the demands of sustained development in emerging markets. Guides, rangers, researchers, ecotourists, photographers, artists and conservationists around the world apply themselves everyday to sharing, studying, photographing, writing about, protecting, conserving and celebrating the “wild” with their guests, co-workers, colleagues, and local communities. These amazing photographs are a window into their world, a world where the lions, elephants, orangutans and leopards still reign supreme and we can dream of that perfect morning in the wilderness.


Ranger Diaries and The Bush Boyes have teamed up to bring you the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness”. These stunning photographs are selected from hundreds of submissions and are intended to bring the beauty, freedom and splendor of the wilderness to as many people as possible around the world. Please submit your best photographs from the wildest places to the Bush Boyes wall or Ranger Diaries website, and stand a chance of being featured in the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness” published each week. This initiative is all about SHARING and CARING about wild places. Please “Like” this blog post and share this link with as many people as possible… So begins the “Ranger Revolution”… Anyone can be an “Honorary Ranger” if they share and care about the wilderness, stimulating positive change for wild places around the world… Join the “Ranger Revolution” now!



Please go to the Ranger Diaries website: and become part of the “Ranger Revolution” by sharing your amazing photographs!

“Every year, my brother (Chris Boyes), Pete (“the Nare”) Hugo, Giles (“Prince William”) Trevethick and I (Dr Steve Boyes) cross the Okavango Delta, top to bottom, on mokoros (dug-out canoes) to survey the distribution and abundance of wetland birds, advocate for World Heritage Status, and share this amazing wilderness with accompanying scientists, explorers and special guests. My wife, Dr Kirsten Wimberger, joined us for the first time this year. No one will forget what happened on the 2012 expedition…”


In 2013, we are embarking on the Okavango River Expedition. This will be a 1,750km odyssey down the Okavango River from the source near Huambo (Angola) all the way down the catchment, across the Caprivi Strip (Namibia), and into Botswana to cross the Okavango Delta via one of our planet’s last untouched wilderness areas. Our objective is to support the Okavango World Heritage Project and achieve UNESCO World Heritage Status for the Okavango Delta and the entire catchment. See:


“Like” the Bush Boyes page and stand a chance to WIN one of two amazing Citizen watches… Go to:

Steve Boyes has dedicated his life to conserving Africa's wilderness areas and the species that depend upon them. After having worked as a camp manager and wilderness guide in the Okavango Delta and doing his PhD field work on the little-known Meyer's Parrot, Steve took up a position as a Centre of Excellence Postdoctoral Fellow at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology. He has since been appointed the Scientific Director of the Wild Bird Trust and is a 2014 TED Fellow. His work takes him all over Africa, but his day-to-day activities are committed to South Africa's endemic and Critically Endangered Cape Parrot (Poicephalus robustus). Based in Hogsback Village in the Eastern Cape (South Africa), Steve runs the Cape Parrot Project, which aims to stimulate positive change for the species through high-quality research and community-based conservation action. When not in Hogsback, Steve can be found in the Okavango Delta where he explores remote areas of this wetland wilderness on "mokoros" or dug-out canoes to study endangered bird species in areas that are otherwise inaccessible. Steve is a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer for his work in the Okavango Delta and on the Cape Parrot Project.
  • Jayshree Misra

    “The fighter”, by Jonty Bozas. Its like a family pix with the wart hog. Nice grouping.

  • Jayshree Misra

    Love this one. “Wise cow”, by guide Grant Pengilly. I can imagine a life-size photo-poster of this.

  • Jayshree Misra

    Love this one too. “Wise cow”, by guide Grant Pengilly. I can imagine a life-size photo-poster of this.

  • Alicia Henry

    cool pictures even though my sister likes big cats

  • Yo Menashe

    I find the “Ranger Diaries” logo distracting because it overpowers the pictures — it’s the first thing you see. Other photographers are able to ID their pictures without this distraction. Now, when I see Ranger Diary pictures, I skip them.

  • FItria

    “Giraffe and birds” is amazing. I feel something when I see the picture.

  • Eduardo Orri

    Can we buy this pictures somewhere in good quality?

  • mohammadamin ahmadpour

    hi.god is very very big.he is designer of nature and animals.thx for nice pics.

  • Joaquin

    the “elephant in the clouds” is great, just the right moment make an amazing picture, really unique photography

  • Maureen

    Beautiful photography. However I am very disappointed that a publication of NG’s calibre can make such an error, in stating that the Isle of Skye is part of England, when it is very much a Scottish Island.

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