Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #38

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Every week we are astonished by the breathtaking beauty of the birds of the world! Up until recently very few people had access to a telescope or pair of binoculars that could actually focus on and see small birds and animals at a distance. The earliest naturalists were all hunters and collectors with a sling shot or a pellet gun that had to kill hundreds of birds and animals for research, taxonomy and museum collections. There were no cameras with long, fast lenses capable of freezing reality in all its glory. No other way of sharing the wonders they were seeing in far off places with people back home. David Attenborough actually started his career with the BBC’s “Zoo Quest”, a ground-breaking show about catching exotic creatures for zoos. Today, birding, nature photography, and wildlife filmmaking are growth industries with millions of people able to own binoculars and DSLR cameras. Hunting is in decline. Amazingly, this stunning series of wild bird photographs from around the world would have been impossible five years ago. This phenomenon is worth sharing! We are more connected than ever, and united we can save our natural heritage for future generations…

 

Join the Wild Bird Revolution today!! Be the first to introduce your friends, family and colleagues to the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild! Advances in digital photography have given us the opportunity to capture the beauty and freedom of birds in the wild like never before. Here are the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” drawn from the thousands of photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust for consideration every week. Celebrate the freedom and splendor of birds in the wild with us and stimulate positive change by sharing how beautiful the birds of the world really are…

 

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Silver-breasted broadbills are found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. Their natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Gururaj Moorching)
Silver-breasted broadbills are found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. Their natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (Gururaj Moorching)
Jackal buzzards have a wide distribution in S Africa and are often seen on vantage points like poles and dead trees at higher altitudes in open habitat. (Jay van Rensburg)
Jackal buzzards have a wide distribution in S Africa and are often seen on vantage points like poles and dead trees at higher altitudes in open habitat. (Jay van Rensburg)
African paradise flycatchers are common resident breeders in Africa S of the Sahara Desert, preferring open forest and savannah habitat. The males have a tail up to 20cm long and are very territorial during the breeding season. (Antero Topp)
African paradise flycatchers are common resident breeders in Africa S of the Sahara Desert, preferring open forest and savannah habitat. The males have a tail up to 20cm long and are very territorial during the breeding season. (Antero Topp)
Oriental dwarf kingfishers are widespread residents of lowland forest habitat, and are endemic across much of SE Asia and the Indian Subcontinent. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. (Azmi Jailani)
Oriental dwarf kingfishers are widespread residents of lowland forest habitat, and are endemic across much of SE Asia and the Indian Subcontinent. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. (Azmi Jailani)
Blue-faced honeyeaters are found in the open woodlands, parks, and gardens of N and E Australia, as well as S New Guinea. Photographed here in Brisbane. (Andrey Varlamov)
Blue-faced honeyeaters are found in the open woodlands, parks, and gardens of N and E Australia, as well as S New Guinea. Photographed here in Brisbane. (Andrey Varlamov)
White storks migrate between Europe and Africa and avoid crossing the Mediterranean Sea by a detour via the Levant in the E or the Strait of Gibraltar in the W. The air thermals on which they fly do not form over water... (Guido Muratore)
White storks migrate between Europe and Africa and avoid crossing the Mediterranean Sea by a detour via the Levant in the E or the Strait of Gibraltar in the W. The air thermals on which they fly do not form over water… (Guido Muratore)
Spotted thick-knees are found through sub-Saharan Africa and prefer dry grassland and savanna habitats. They characteristically fake injuries to lead predators away from the nest. (Denis Smit)
Spotted thick-knees are found through sub-Saharan Africa and prefer dry grassland and savanna habitats. They characteristically fake injuries to lead predators away from the nest. (Denis Smit)
Red-legged crakes are found in NE India, S Burma, Thailand, Malay Peninsula, Borneo and Indonesia. They prefer dense vegetation close to permanent wetlands. (Frans Jephi)
Red-legged crakes are found in NE India, S Burma, Thailand, Malay Peninsula, Borneo and Indonesia. They prefer dense vegetation close to permanent wetlands. (Frans Jephi)
Black-winged stilt breed in marshes, shallow lakes and ponds around the world with migratory and non-migratory populations and several subspecies. (Guido Muratore)
Black-winged stilt breed in marshes, shallow lakes and ponds around the world with migratory and non-migratory populations and several subspecies. (Guido Muratore)
Carolina or wood ducks are only found in N America, breeding in wooded swamps, shallow lakes, marshes or ponds, and creeks in E North America, the W coast of the United States and W Mexico. (Ken Chuah)
Carolina or wood ducks are only found in N America, breeding in wooded swamps, shallow lakes, marshes or ponds, and creeks in E North America, the W coast of the United States and W Mexico. (Ken Chuah)
Common waxbills are indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa, but have been introduced to many other regions and now have an estimated global extent of occurrence of 10,000,000 km². (Rodnick Clifton Biljon)
Common waxbills are indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa, but have been introduced to many other regions and now have an estimated global extent of occurrence of 10,000,000 km². (Rodnick Clifton Biljon)
Crested barbets are found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. They prefer Forests, savannah and sub-urban gardens, woodland thickets and watercourses. (Dan Anne Marks)
Crested barbets are found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. They prefer Forests, savannah and sub-urban gardens, woodland thickets and watercourses. (Dan Anne Marks)
Malaysian plovers are uncommon on the beaches and salt flats of SE Asia. They are near-threatened with about 10,000 individuals. Photographed here in West Borneo (Indonesia). (Frans Jephi)
Malaysian plovers are uncommon on the beaches and salt flats of SE Asia. They are near-threatened with about 10,000 individuals. Photographed here in West Borneo (Indonesia). (Frans Jephi)
Green Violet-ears range from the highlands of S Mexico to Honduras; the highlands of Costa Rica and W Panama; mountains of N Venezuela and the Andes from W Venezuela to W Bolivia. (Kevin Murphy)
Green Violet-ears range from the highlands of S Mexico to Honduras; the highlands of Costa Rica and W Panama; mountains of N Venezuela and the Andes from W Venezuela to W Bolivia. (Kevin Murphy)
Asian koels are brood parasites that lays their eggs in the nests of crows and other hosts, who raise their young for them. They are found in S Asia, China, and SE Asia. (Sudheer Pandey)
Asian koels are brood parasites that lays their eggs in the nests of crows and other hosts, who raise their young for them. They are found in S Asia, China, and SE Asia. (Sudheer Pandey)
s are found in found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Photographed here in Mabamba Wetland (Uganda). (Artur Bujanowicz)
s are found in found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Photographed here in Mabamba Wetland (Uganda). (Artur Bujanowicz)
Purple-crested turacos are found in Burundi, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. They prefer moist woodland and evergreen forests. (Chris Krog)
Purple-crested turacos are found in Burundi, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. They prefer moist woodland and evergreen forests. (Chris Krog)
Bald eagles are the national bird of the United States of America and appears on the Seal. By the late 20th century they were on the brink of extirpation in the continental United States, but have since recovered and have been removed from the U.S. federal government's list of endangered species. (Joshua McCullough)
Bald eagles are the national bird of the United States of America and appears on the Seal. By the late 20th century they were on the brink of extirpation in the continental United States, but have since recovered and have been removed from the U.S. federal government’s list of endangered species. (Joshua McCullough)
Little bee-eaters are resident throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. Photographed here deciding not to eat this African monarch butterfly in the knowledge that it is poisonous. (Chris Krog)
Little bee-eaters are resident throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. Photographed here deciding not to eat this African monarch butterfly in the knowledge that it is poisonous. (Chris Krog)
Red-ruffed fruitcrows are one of largest passerine birds in South America. There are population associated with the Tepuis in Venezuela and Guyana, the E Andean slopes in Peru, Andean slopes in NW Ecuador, Colombia and W Venezuela, the Venezuelan Coastal Range, and Atlantic Forest in SE Brazil, E Paraguay and NE Argentina. (Adam Riley / www.rockjumperbirding.com)
Red-ruffed fruitcrows are one of largest passerine birds in South America. There are population associated with the Tepuis in Venezuela and Guyana, the E Andean slopes in Peru, Andean slopes in NW Ecuador, Colombia and W Venezuela, the Venezuelan Coastal Range, and Atlantic Forest in SE Brazil, E Paraguay and NE Argentina. (Adam Riley / www.rockjumperbirding.com)
Purple sunbirds are distributed widely from W Asia to the Indian Subcontinent and into SE Asia. They are resident birds in most parts of their range and do not move large distances. (Raj Sarkar)
Purple sunbirds are distributed widely from W Asia to the Indian Subcontinent and into SE Asia. They are resident birds in most parts of their range and do not move large distances. (Raj Sarkar)
Cape gannets rarely go more than 100km out to ocean and their distribution extends from the coastal waters off the Gulf of Guinea on the W coast of Africa to Mozambique on the E coast. (Peter Chadwick)
Cape gannets rarely go more than 100km out to ocean and their distribution extends from the coastal waters off the Gulf of Guinea on the W coast of Africa to Mozambique on the E coast. (Peter Chadwick)
Martial eagles are found in most of sub-Saharan Africa, wherever food is abundant and the environment favorable. They are never common, but greater population densities do exist in S Africa, especially in Zimbabwe and South Africa. (Shirell Lynch)
Martial eagles are found in most of sub-Saharan Africa, wherever food is abundant and the environment favorable. They are never common, but greater population densities do exist in S Africa, especially in Zimbabwe and South Africa. (Shirell Lynch)
White-cheeked barbets are endemic to the forest areas of the W Ghats and adjoining hills (India). During the breeding season which begins at the start of summer their calls become loud and constant especially in the mornings. (Gururaj Moorching)
White-cheeked barbets are endemic to the forest areas of the W Ghats and adjoining hills (India). During the breeding season which begins at the start of summer their calls become loud and constant especially in the mornings. (Gururaj Moorching)
The little-known scaly-breasted kingfisher is endemic to Indonesia, and prefers subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. (David Hoddinott / www.rockjumperbirding.com)

 

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See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #36″: 

Human Journey

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Steve Boyes has dedicated his life to conserving Africa's wilderness areas and the species that depend upon them. After having worked as a camp manager and wilderness guide in the Okavango Delta and doing his PhD field work on the little-known Meyer's Parrot, Steve took up a position as a Centre of Excellence Postdoctoral Fellow at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology. He has since been appointed the Scientific Director of the Wild Bird Trust and is a 2014 TED Fellow. His work takes him all over Africa, but his day-to-day activities are committed to South Africa's endemic and Critically Endangered Cape Parrot (Poicephalus robustus). Based in Hogsback Village in the Eastern Cape (South Africa), Steve runs the Cape Parrot Project, which aims to stimulate positive change for the species through high-quality research and community-based conservation action. When not in Hogsback, Steve can be found in the Okavango Delta where he explores remote areas of this wetland wilderness on "mokoros" or dug-out canoes to study endangered bird species in areas that are otherwise inaccessible. Steve is a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer for his work in the Okavango Delta and on the Cape Parrot Project.