Top 10 Headlines Today: Mammals ‘Select’ Sex of Offspring, Melting Icebergs Create Sound

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The top 10 news stories on our radar today.
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  1. Mammals Can ‘Choose’ Sex of Offspring, Study Finds

    “Researchers were able to prove for the first time…that mammals rely on some unknown physiologic mechanism to manipulate the sex ratios of their offspring.” Stanford School of Medicine

    Animals

  2. Melting of Iceberg Creates Surprising Ocean Sound

    “Now a new study has found that the mere drifting of an iceberg from near Antarctica to warmer ocean waters produces startling levels of noise.” Oregon State University

    Environment

  3. Speedy Tsunami Seen on Sun’s Surface

    “Two Earth-orbiting satellites have caught sight of speeding “tsunami” on the surface of the Sun after an event called a coronal mass ejection (CME).” BBC

    Space

  4. 5,000-Year-Old ‘Chinese Characters’ Discovered

    “Chinese archeologists have unearthed ancient inscriptions dating back around 5,000 years that some believe could represent the earliest known record of Chinese characters.” The Telegraph

    Ancient

  5. Worms Regrow Decapitated Heads and Memories

    Researchers studying the planarian, found that “after the worm’s small, snake-like head and neck are removed, its body will even regrow a brain that’s capable of quickly relearning its lost skills.” The Verge

    Animals

  6. Egyptian Sphinx Paws Found in Egypt

    “Archaeologists digging in Israel say they have made an unexpected find: the feet of an Egyptian sphinx linked to a pyramid-building pharaoh.” Huffington Post

    Ancient

  7. Redefining the Second

    “A new atomic clock is so stable and reliable that it may be used to redefine our measurement of the second.” National Geographic

    Tech

  8. National Park on the Moon Proposed

    “The proposed park would protect artifacts left on the moon by NASA astronauts, and not the lunar surface itself, but it still raises legal and logistical questions.” Mother Nature Network

    Space

  9. Lost Military Plane Revealed as Glacier Melts

    “An Alaska glacier is exposing remains from a military air tragedy six decades later.” Reuters

    People

  10. An Illustrated History of Camouflaged Ships

    “Many ships in history have been well-camouflaged, despite a distinct lack of cloaking devices. Here are some of the most amazing examples.” IO9

    Just for Fun

Human Journey

Alexis Manning has worked for National Geographic Television and National Geographic News. She has a passion for travel, conservation, and photography.