Changing Planet

Top 10 Bird Photographs (Fishy Ugandan Tales: Episode 7)

Hidden under the vegetation found in most wetlands is an incredibly diverse world of aquatic organisms. On most of the mornings I’ve been here at Lake Nabugabo, in Uganda, I’ve made my way to the wetlands surrounding the lake searching for fish, as I’m currently interested in the effects of habitat-use on mercury contamination in aquatic organisms. Accompanied by another member of my lab conducting research on fish coloration, Logan Smith, we regularly set nets and minnow traps in the dense water lilies of the wetlands.

Although our main interest was the underwater world of this habitat, Logan also took a keen interest in the birds we would see along the way.   I asked Logan if I could share with you his top ten bird photographs taken over the course of our field season here. …And these are the incredible pictures Logan Smith passed along to me:

Northern Masked Weaver
Northern Masked Weaver

 

Pied Kingfisher
Pied Kingfisher
Red-throated Bee-eater
Red-throated Bee-eater
Hamerkop
Hamerkop
Grey-headed Gull
Grey-headed Gull
Grey-crowned Cranes
Grey-crowned Cranes
Lilac-breasted Roller
Great Egret
Great Egret
Black-and-white-casqued Hornbill
Black-and-white-casqued Hornbill
Brown Parrot
Brown Parrot
Since as far as I can remember I've spent my time outside attempting to understand and connect with the natural world that surrounds us. When it came time to make a career choice, this lead me toward research in ecology and conservation, topics that are of fundamental importance to me. I completed a Bachelors degree in Environmental Sciences at the University of Ottawa in 2011, during which I studied the effects anthropogenic traffic noise on birdsong; discovering the impacts human activity has on even the most unexpected aspects of animal life! I then completed a cross-Canada canoe journey in partnership with the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society & the Ottawa Riverkeeper Alliance raising funds and awareness for watershed conservation. Between 2012 & 2014 I studied mercury contamination in African freshwater fish as part of a Masters degree in Biology at McGill University. (The stories in this blog series are from my field work in Uganda!) Following this, I spent time developing Science Faction, a podcast all about unbelievable discoveries and creating an urban beekeeping collective in Montreal, Canada, with which we teach locals about beekeeping and pollinator gardens. Today, I'm working on a PhD in the department of Natural Resource Sciences at McGill University, during which I will explore questions related to riverine ecosystem service conservation.
  • Karin Hughes

    Dalal thank you for filing these . They are beautiful.

  • Dan

    Excellent photos Dalal. I was jealous of your trip during previous posts, but these birds put me over the top.

  • Steven. wonder

    nice pics really fasinating

  • tricia donegan

    That is WHY every species is worth saving

  • Akugizibwe Joel

    Uganda really true birder’s haven ,what a beautiful tourism destination!

  • Elizabeth

    What wonderful photographs!

    The lovely lilac-breasted roller photo is now my desktop background. What a magnificent bird.

    thank you for sharing these!

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