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Visualizing the Psychology of Attraction

Asking “how do we capture attention,” this infographic from Iconic Displays makes a brief survey of the science of attraction. In college, my friend and roommate worked on a research project in this area. At the time, he told me that much of attraction is about symmetry, with the underlying biological assumption that organisms with better symmetry...

psychologyofattraction-2

Asking “how do we capture attention,” this infographic from Iconic Displays makes a brief survey of the science of attraction.

In college, my friend and roommate worked on a research project in this area. At the time, he told me that much of attraction is about symmetry, with the underlying biological assumption that organisms with better symmetry are likely to have better genes.

My friend made composite faces of women and showed them to volunteer men, asking them to rate which ones they found the most attractive. In what may sound a bit disturbing, what he found was that the more a woman’s face approximated the structure of a young boy’s, the more men liked it.

One hypothesis he had was that what was really going on was selection toward youthfulness, which might be explained as more time for reproducing.

What do you find most attractive?

 

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