Wildlife

Video: Florida Black Bear Cub

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition team and I recently hosted Casey Anderson and a National Geographic TV crew to film content for an upcoming episode of America the Wild: Gator Country.

While working on a cattle ranch in the Everglades Headwaters region of Central Florida, I set up a remote camera on a clearing of rare cutthroat grass among pine flatwoods and ancient scrub. Joe Guthrie and colleagues from the University of Kentucky were trapping black bears nearby to outfit them with GPS tracking collars and National Geographic CritterCams.

You can see a short GoPro video clip of a bear cub coming into the clearing and hear the shutter of my dSLR camera firing. Check out the the resulting still frame below.

A young Florida black bear walks in front of a remote camera set in a clearing of cutthroat grass among pine woods and ancient scrub in the Everglades Headwaters region of Central Florida. Photo by Carlton Ward Jr / Carlton Ward.com

 

Learn more about The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition team’s 1,000-mile trek through the heart of Florida and their groundbreaking efforts to conserve the Everglades.

Carlton Ward Jr is a conservation photographer and eighth generation Floridian currently focused on the story of the Florida panther and the habitat protection needed to protect the Florida Wildlife Corridor.
  • ashley

    This is the only “shooting”(camera) which should be allowed in our imperiled wildlife corridor. The recent, misguided, open season on Florida Black Bears was a horrible tragedy not to be repeated. The only way to truly “conserve” and protect our wildlife will be to dismiss and replace those FWCC officials responsible for the Bear massacre. Only those who are sincerely concerned for the welfare and preservation of our Folrida wildlife and habitat should be running the FWCC.

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