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Yale F&ES 30th Annual Doctoral Student Research Conference

October 4, 2013. Yale University – Peter Kareiva, Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy was the keynote speaker at the Yale F&ES 30th Annual Doctoral Student Research Conference. His talk entitled, “Conservation that can make a difference: Choosing Gifford Pinchot over Grizzly Adams” took place at Kroon Hall. Kareiva, named in 2011 a member of...

October 4, 2013. Yale University – Peter Kareiva, Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy was the keynote speaker at the Yale F&ES 30th Annual Doctoral Student Research Conference. His talk entitled, “Conservation that can make a difference: Choosing Gifford Pinchot over Grizzly Adams” took place at Kroon Hall. Kareiva, named in 2011 a member of the National Academy of Sciences for his excellence in original scientific research, is responsible for developing and helping to implement science-based conservation throughout his organization.   Burke Auditorium, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

Peter Kareiva, Ph.D. Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy.
Peter Kareiva at the Yale F&ES 30th Annual Doctoral Student Research Conference. Photo © KIKE CALVO

 

Peter Kareiva at the Yale F&ES 30th Annual Doctoral Student Research Conference. Photo © KIKE CALVO

 

Peter Kareiva, Ph.D. Chief Scientist for The Nature Conservancy.
Peter Kareiva at the Yale F&ES 30th Annual Doctoral Student Research Conference. Photo © KIKE CALVO

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Meet the Author

Kike Calvo
Award-winning photographer, journalist, and author Kike Calvo (pronounced key-keh) specializes in culture and environment. He has been on assignment in more than 90 countries, working on stories ranging from belugas in the Arctic to traditional Hmong costumes in Laos. Kike is pioneering in using small unmanned aerial systems to produce aerial photography as art, and as a tool for research and conservation. He is also known for his iconic photographic project, World of Dances, on the intersection of dance, nature, and architecture. His work has been published in National Geographic, New York Times, Time, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, Rolling Stone, and Vanity Fair, among others. Kike teaches photography workshops and has been a guest lecturer at leading institutions like the School of Visual Arts and Yale University. He is a regular contributor to National Geographic blog Voices. He has authored nine books, including Drones for Conservation; So You Want to Create Maps Using Drones?; Staten Island: A Visual Journey to the Lighthouse at the End of the World; and Habitats, with forewords by David Doubilet and Jean-Michel Cousteau. Kike’s images have been exhibited around the world, and are represented by the National Geographic Image Collection. Kike was born in Spain and is based in New York. When he is not on assignment, he is making gazpacho following his grandmother’s Andalusian recipe. You can travel to Colombia with Kike: www.colombiaphotoexpeditions.com