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Exploring Fisheating Creek

Earlier in October, I had a chance to be part of the first group to stand-up paddle the length of Fisheating Creek – a remote and wild tributary to Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades. It was a joint effort between the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition and Justin Riney’s Expedition Florida 500, with special guests Maggy...

Earlier in October, I had a chance to be part of the first group to stand-up paddle the length of Fisheating Creek – a remote and wild tributary to Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades. It was a joint effort between the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition and Justin Riney’s Expedition Florida 500, with special guests Maggy and Jim Hurchalla. Here are a few photographs from the journey. A more detailed three-part series by Maggy Hurchalla featuring more imagery is now posted in our complete Florida Wildlife Corridor posts on NG Explorers Journal.

The nose of my stand-up paddle board slices through a cypress-lined pond in Fisheating Creek. Photo by Carlton Ward Jr / CarltonWard.com
On the second night, the only suitable trees for hanging my hammock shelter happened to be above water.
On the second night, the only suitable trees for hanging a hammock shelter happened to be above water. Photo by Carlton Ward Jr / CarltonWard.com
A charismatic cypress tree makes its presence know at a bend in Fisheating Creek downstream from Palmdale. Photograph by Carlton Ward Jr / CarltonWard.com
Reconfiguring my gear after falling into the creek during the first day. Photo by Joe Guthrie.
Shuffling gear after an oak snag sent me swimming on the first day. Photo by Joe Guthrie.

 

Links:

Expedition Members Paddle Everglades Tributary

Extended slideshow on WFIT Public Radio’s website

Florida Wildlife Corridor Website

Fisheating Creek Expedition by Maggy Reno Hurchalla

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Meet the Author

Carlton Ward Jr
Carlton Ward Jr is a conservation photographer and eighth generation Floridian currently focused on the story of the Florida panther and the habitat protection needed to protect the Florida Wildlife Corridor.