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Beautiful Nature Photography from Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

When you love your work should it really be called ‘work’?  Perhaps Nat Geo has got it right to call it ‘exploration’.  We were blessed to explore this most beautiful place and in the course of our ‘work’ my vulture trapping partner, Shiv Kapila took these amazing photographs in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy. We gratefully...

When you love your work should it really be called ‘work’?  Perhaps Nat Geo has got it right to call it ‘exploration’.  We were blessed to explore this most beautiful place and in the course of our ‘work’ my vulture trapping partner, Shiv Kapila took these amazing photographs in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy.

Black-backed jackal getting his share of the carcass. Photo by S. Kapila
Black-backed jackal getting his share of the carcass. Photo by S. Kapila
A jackal at our carcass while the vultures wait their turn. Photo by S. Kapila
A jackal at our carcass while the vultures wait their turn. Photo by S. Kapila
An amazing sighting of 6 cheetahs. Photo by S. Kapila
An amazing sighting of 6 cheetahs. Photo by S. Kapila
After an unsuccessful zebra hunt. Photo by S. Kapila
After an unsuccessful zebra hunt. Photo by S. Kapila
Wild dogs resting during the day. Photo by S. Kapila
Wild dogs resting during the day. Photo by S. Kapila
Wild dog on the move. Photo by S. Kapila
Wild dog on the move. Photo by S. Kapila
A migrant Montagu's Harrier. Photo by S. Kapila
A migrant Montagu’s Harrier. Photo by S. Kapila
Cheetah on the move. Photo by S. Kapila
Cheetah on the move. Photo by S. Kapila
Elephant in the marsh. Photo by D. Ogada
Elephant in the marsh. Photo by D. Ogada

We gratefully acknowledge the following organizations for their support of our northern Kenya vulture project: National Geographic Society Conservation Trust, Chester Zoo, Raptor Research Foundation-Leslie Brown Memorial Grant, Ol Pejeta Conservancy, North Star Science, and American Bird Conservancy.

NEXTElephant Poachers Poison Hundreds of Vultures to Evade Authorities

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Meet the Author

Darcy Ogada
Darcy has worked for The Peregrine Fund’s Africa Program since 2010 and is based in central Kenya. Most of her current work focuses on the conservation of vultures and owls. She is particularly passionate about ending the scourge of wildlife poisoning and stopping the illegal trafficking of owl eggs for belief-based uses in East Africa. Prior to joining The Peregrine Fund she undertook a post-doctoral fellowship with the Smithsonian Institution based at Mpala Research Centre, Kenya. She has studied Mackinder’s Eagle Owls in central Kenya and conducted other research on birds and rodents. She volunteered for the Peace Corps in Niger in 1995 and got her start studying wildlife as a Bald Eagle Nestwatcher for New York State’s Department of Environmental Conservation. She came to Kenya in 2000 where she has lived ever since. Before moving to Kenya she was an avid skier and ice hockey player, now she spends her free time swimming, birding, and hiking and exploring Africa’s mountains with her son. She’s actively involved in a host of local conservation issues as a member of Nature Kenya’s Bird Committee and the Kenya Wildlife Service Bird Taskforce.