Changing Planet

Give Back to the Ocean on #GivingTuesday

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A seal slides through the clear water. (Photo by Enric Sala)

With Thanksgiving now a glorious gastronomic memory and Christmas soon upon us, the holiday season for gratitude and giving is in full swing. On Tuesday December 3, 2013, global charities, families, businesses, community centers, students and more will come together to create #GivingTuesday. This national day of giving celebrates and encourages charitable activities that support nonprofit organizations.

National Geographic welcomes Giving Tuesday and its powerful message about the importance of giving back. Help give the next generation a better planet by supporting our mission today. Your donation will support society-wide initiatives like the Ocean Initiative,  National Geographic’s ocean program to help identify and support individuals and organizations that are using creative and entrepreneurial approaches to marine conservation.

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Click here to interact with a map of current and past Pristine Seas Expeditions.

Your donation especially helps continue the diligent work of the Pristine Seas Expedition lead by Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala.

Pristine Seas is an exploration, research, and media project to find, survey, and help protect the last wild places in the ocean. These pristine places are unknown by all but long-distance fishing fleets, which have started to encroach on them. It is essential that we let the world know that these places exist, that they are threatened, and that they deserve to be protected.

Click here to read Enric Sala’s latest dispatches from remote New Caledonia

On Giving Tuesday help give the next generation a better planet by supporting the work of National Geographic’s Ocean Initiative. Text OCEANS to 50555 to donate $10. Message and Data Rates May Apply. Terms: mGive.com/T.

Interested in donating more than $10? Click here. 

GivingTuesday-NG

  • André Dünner

    Do you know about Zero-Point-Energy-Field-Areas?
    There is one individual of it. Recently I understand knowing. Knowing to know. I know too little.
    Newer expression of known in terms of knowledge.
    Only; may it changes or maintains our world and may us selves.

    Ask your scientist, your doctor, pharmacologist or bag’s advises … and study it’s terms exactly.

    Or, simply ask your heart. It is part of some infinite beautiful.
    Give it a chance.
    Helping our World and Oceans not only one day in a year.

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