This Will Shatter Your View of Apex Predators: How Wolves Change Rivers

Have a look at this amazing video showing how one species can have a massive cascading effect on the entire ecosystem in which it lives… and even alter the geography of the area. 

UPDATE: Here is an alternative view of the story and research expressed in the above video – Is the Wolf the new American Hero? 

 

This may be one of the most important conservation concepts to come out of natural science in the last half century. The thing about this case study is that the same can be applied to apex predators around the world: lions in Africa, tigers in Asia. Sharks, bears, and wild dogs are all species sitting at the top of their respective food chains, creating stability amongst the species they prey on and maintaining the health of plants and animals right down the trophic ladder.

The sad part is that some of these apex predators are in decline, sometimes jeopardising ecosystems on which they and other species rely.

With all this in mind, it’s time for us humans to adjust our perception of predators in general. We can’t be agreeing to mass culling of sharks as has recently been sanctioned in western Australia. (Also see: Western Australia’s Controversial Shark Cull Claims First Casualty)

Human/wildlife conflict is a reality of growing populations around the world, and the fact is that we need to learn to live beside wildlife if we are to maintain our wonderful thriving ecosystems in the future.

Follow Paul Steyn on Twitter and Instagram @steynless

Paul Steyn is a widely-published multi-media content producer from South Africa, and regular contributor to National Geographic News and blogs. Having guided throughout Africa for some years, he went on to edit a prominent travel and wildlife magazine, and now focuses on nature storytelling in all its forms. In 2013, he joined a team of researchers and Bayei on a 250km transect of the Okavango Delta on traditional mokoros. In 2016, he accompanied the Great Elephant Census team in Tanzania and broke the groundbreaking results on National Geographic News . Contact: paul@paulsteyn.com Follow Paul on Twitter or Instagram

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