Coal & Climate: Ask Your Questions About Environmental Science

Juliette, Georgia
 Steam and smoke rise from the cooling towers and chimneys of the Robert W. Scherer power plant, the largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the U.S. It burns 12 million tons of coal a year.
Juliette, Georgia

Steam and smoke rise from the cooling towers and chimneys of the Robert W. Scherer power plant, the largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the U.S. It burns 12 million tons of coal a year. Photograph by Rob Kendrick/National Geographic

We burn eight million tons of coal—the dirtiest of fossil fuels—each year, and the consequences are growing. In the April issue of National Geographic magazine, we asked the question: Can coal ever be clean?

What are your thoughts about clean energy? How about freshwater or the growing global population? Do you have questions about oil spills, the changing climate, or other environmental science-related issues?

This Friday, March 28 at 12:30 p.m. ET, join us for a live Twitter chat about environmental science with Michelle Nijhuis, author of the “Can Coal Ever Be Clean?” feature, and Dennis Dimick, executive editor of National Geographic magazine. Follow MichelleDennis, and @NatGeoLive on Twitter and tweet your questions using #NatGeoLive.

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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