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Hubble Telescope Unveils Most Colorful View of the Universe Yet

NASA’s Hubble space telescope has unveiled its most colorful window into the universe yet, a glimpse of some 10,000 galaxies spread across space. Some of those universes date to the era of the first galaxies. The Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) image released this week combines views of the sky taken from 2003 to 2009...

Composite visible and near infrared light collected from Hubble over a nine-year period.
Courtesy of NASA/ESA

NASA’s Hubble space telescope has unveiled its most colorful window into the universe yet, a glimpse of some 10,000 galaxies spread across space. Some of those universes date to the era of the first galaxies.

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) image released this week combines views of the sky taken from 2003 to 2009 near the constellation Fornax, the Furnace, with ultraviolet light imagery from the same region of the sky, according to the space agency. Combined with existing infrared and visible-light surveys, the ultraviolet imagery fills out the deep field view with galaxies that came into existence within the last 10 billion years, when most stars were born.

“The lack of information from ultraviolet light made studying galaxies in the HUDF like trying to understand the history of families without knowing about the grade-school children,” said Hubble team member Harry Teplitz of the California Institute of Technology. “The addition of the ultraviolet fills in this missing range.”

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