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Be a Part of the Ice Cream Expedition

It’s summer time here in the northern climes, and that means kids are out of school. The streets and parks are filled with overheated, under-educated masses of little folk lolling about looking for something to do. It is a situation not to be taken lightly. Thankfully, three NG Young Explorers Grantees think they have a...

It’s summer time here in the northern climes, and that means kids are out of school. The streets and parks are filled with overheated, under-educated masses of little folk lolling about looking for something to do.

It is a situation not to be taken lightly.

Thankfully, three NG Young Explorers Grantees think they have a solution: inspire the kids to explore nature, convince them to help conserve it, and (to address the heat part of the equation) give them ice cream.

This video explains the whole thing:

There is of course the added hope that by inspiring the young generation to be good stewards of nature, it could help minimize the chance that by 2025 Earth will be too hot for ice cream to even exist.*

To learn more about the project, and to take a direct action to help make it happen, visit the Ice Cream Expedition on Kickstarter.

*Not a real projection of the potential impact of climate change.

 

About National Geographic Society

The National Geographic Society is a global nonprofit organization that uses the power of science, exploration, education and storytelling to illuminate and protect the wonder of the world. Since 1888, National Geographic has pushed the boundaries of exploration, investing in bold people and transformative ideas, providing more than 14,000 grants for work across all seven continents, reaching 3 million students each year through education offerings, and engaging audiences around the globe through signature experiences, stories and content. To learn more, visit www.nationalgeographic.org or follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Meet the Author

Andrew Howley
Andrew Howley is a longtime contributor to the National Geographic blog, with a particular focus on archaeology and paleoanthropology generally, and ancient rock art in particular. In 2018 he became Communications Director at Adventure Scientists, founded by Nat Geo Explorer Gregg Treinish. Over 11 years at the National Geographic Society, Andrew worked in various ways to share the stories of NG explorers and grantees online. He also produced the Home Page of nationalgeographic.com for several years, and helped manage the Society's Facebook page during its breakout year of 2010. He studied Anthropology with a focus on Archaeology from the College of William & Mary in Virginia. He has covered expeditions with NG Explorers-in-Residence Mike Fay, Enric Sala, and Lee Berger. His personal interests include painting, running, and reading about history. You can follow him on Twitter @anderhowl and on Instagram @andrewjhowley.