Living Walls Turn Maasai Hunters into Lion Defenders (Video)

In a land where the lion truly is king, attitudes about traditional lion hunts are changing. Two Maasai people – one lion slayer and one lion savior – share the stories of their respective journeys. Species are disappearing at a rate that has scientists around the world calling this period the sixth mass extinction. Today, the warriors of the Maasai Steppe – old and new – are recognizing the value of living lions to their culture and economy. You might have read the story, now hear it from the mouths of Julius Laizer and Lucas Lengoje themselves about how they came to trade their spears for shields through the Maasai Steppe Big Cats Conservation Initiative.

By Deirdre Leowinata, African People & Wildlife Fund

Deirdre started as a biologist, completing her Bachelor of Science at the University of Ottawa in 2012 with a specialization in evolution, ecology, and behaviour. That degree ignited a passion for novel science communication, leading to a post-graduate certificate in Environmental Visual Communication through a joint program between Fleming College and the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada. She fell in love with the wilds of Africa in 2009, and now acts as the media and communications coordinator at the African People and Wildlife Fund, based on the Maasai Steppe in Tanzania, just steps away from Tarangire National Park.

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