Human Journey

Help National Geographic Give on #GivingTuesday

giving-tuesday

This year marks the third annual #GivingTuesday, a tradition started by New York’s 92nd Street Y and the United Nations Foundation to rally “charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world … to celebrate generosity and to give.”

For nearly 127 years, the National Geographic Society has supported research and conservation, told stories, and revealed imagery of the wild world and human cultures through every venue we could reach: public lectures, magazines, books, radio, television, film, geography-based education, and one of the biggest social media presences around.

People everywhere know what the National Geographic Society does.

Fewer know how we do it.

The National Geographic Pristine Seas team conducts their first dives while on expedition in Mozambique. (Photo by Dave McAloney)
The National Geographic Pristine Seas team conducts their first dives while on expedition in Mozambique. (Photo by Dave McAloney)

Since its founding in 1888, the work of the Society has only been possible through the volunteering of time, the payment of dues, and the donation of funds, goods, and services from its members. As one benefit of membership, people would receive a periodic printed summary of the research and exploration supported by the group.

A painting by artist Stanley Meltzoff depicts the original gathering of NGS founders at the Cosmos Club on Jan. 13, 1888. The men look eminently Victorian and respectable in the painting; in reality they were much younger -- their average age was only 42 and many were in the prime of their careers. (Painting by Stanley Meltzoff)
A painting by artist Stanley Meltzoff depicts the original gathering of NGS founders at the Cosmos Club on Jan. 13, 1888. In reality at the time their average age was only 42 and instead of looking like heavily bearded elder statesmen, many were in the prime of their careers. (Painting by Stanley Meltzoff)

Now when you subscribe to the Magazine, you become a member. If you take part in the Your Shot photo community, you’re a member. If you read, share, follow, or comment on our stories, you are a member. Money from advertising, licensing, partnerships, and other sales contribute greatly to the funds that make our work possible.

The support of National Geographic members drives some of the most innovative and successful research and conservation programs around. Each year we give out hundreds of grants to explorers and scientists on every continent (more that 10,000 in total since our founding in the 19th century) and run several high-profile projects in different fields. 

Community gaterhing on one of the Uros Islands on the Peruvian side of Lake Titicaca. Genographic Project Expedition to Peru and Bolivia. April-May 2011. Photo for National Geographic by Eduardo Rubiano Moncada
Community gathering on one of the Uros Islands on the Peruvian side of Lake Titicaca. Genographic Project Expedition to Peru and Bolivia. April-May 2011. (Photo for National Geographic by Eduardo Rubiano Moncada)
  • The Pristine Seas project actively explores, documents, and helps to protect the last wild places in the ocean.
  • The Big Cats Initiative funds practical, on-the-ground conservation and education projects to reduce conflicts between humans and big cats, and to stop the rapid decline of these ecologically important top predators from their natural habitats.
  • The Genographic Legacy Fund supports community-driven projects that directly preserve or revitalize indigenous or traditional culture.
  • The Young Explorers Grants program helps people age 18-25 begin their pursuit of science and exploration.
  • And there’s more. 

Everything the National Geographic Society has done for more than a century, is doing today, and will do in the future is a result of the direct support and participation of people around the world with shared interests in science, exploration, and powerful storytelling.

This #GivingTuesday, explore the ways we give around the world and the stories we bring back, and take part yourself by supporting the National Geographic Society through our #GivingTuesday campaign below.

Help Save Big Cats on #GivingTuesday

Andrew Howley is a longtime contributor to the National Geographic blog, with a particular focus on archaeology and paleoanthropology generally, and ancient rock art in particular. In 2018 he became Communications Director at Adventure Scientists, founded by Nat Geo Explorer Gregg Treinish. Over 11 years at the National Geographic Society, Andrew worked in various ways to share the stories of NG explorers and grantees online. He also produced the Home Page of nationalgeographic.com for several years, and helped manage the Society's Facebook page during its breakout year of 2010. He studied Anthropology with a focus on Archaeology from the College of William & Mary in Virginia. He has covered expeditions with NG Explorers-in-Residence Mike Fay, Enric Sala, and Lee Berger. His personal interests include painting, running, and reading about history. You can follow him on Twitter @anderhowl and on Instagram @andrewjhowley.
  • Marcos

    Please if your magazine wants to make conscience,please watch you tv and try to put conscience in the tv too.

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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