National Geographic Society Newsroom

30 Days Till 2015 Expedition Launches

The Florida Wildlife Corridor integrates Florida’s leading conservation science with compelling fine art images and rich storytelling to raise awareness about the Corridor and the need to connect and protect it. The centerpiece of our awareness campaign is the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. On January 10, 2015 we begin a new 1000-mile leg of our...

Carlton Ward Jr. hikes along the Florida National Scenic Trail in the Withlacoochee State Forest earlier this year. The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition will traverse this area in January. (Image courtesy of Carlton Ward Photography)
Carlton Ward Jr. hikes along the Florida National Scenic Trail in the Withlacoochee State Forest earlier this year. The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition will traverse this area in January. (Image courtesy of Carlton Ward Photography)

The Florida Wildlife Corridor integrates Florida’s leading conservation science with compelling fine art images and rich storytelling to raise awareness about the Corridor and the need to connect and protect it. The centerpiece of our awareness campaign is the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition.

On January 10, 2015 we begin a new 1000-mile leg of our Expedition, to highlight a wildlife corridor from Central Florida to the Gulf Coast, through the Big Bend, and across the Panhandle all the way to Alabama, where our trek will conclude.

We’ll document our journey the entire way, using social media to showcase imagery and reporting from the field. We’ll host a series of Saturday Trail Mixers, where followers can join the Expedition team and participate in our trek. We are committed to bringing the Florida Wildlife Corridor to life through our Expedition. Join us!

Why We Walk

  • To connect, protect and restore corridors of conserved lands and waters essential for the survival of Florida’s diverse wildlife
  • To restore and protect our life-giving springs and rivers
  • To sustain food production, economies, and culture surrounding Gulf seafood harvests
  • To restore longleaf pine forests while conserving farms, working lands, and the communities they support

About National Geographic Society

The National Geographic Society is a global nonprofit organization that uses the power of science, exploration, education and storytelling to illuminate and protect the wonder of the world. Since 1888, National Geographic has pushed the boundaries of exploration, investing in bold people and transformative ideas, providing more than 14,000 grants for work across all seven continents, reaching 3 million students each year through education offerings, and engaging audiences around the globe through signature experiences, stories and content. To learn more, visit www.nationalgeographic.org or follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Meet the Author

Carlton Ward Jr
Carlton Ward Jr is a conservation photographer and eighth generation Floridian currently focused on the story of the Florida panther and the habitat protection needed to protect the Florida Wildlife Corridor.