Vote For Cape Parrot As SA’s Favourite Bird!

Birdlife vote

Click here to Vote for CAPE PARROT as South Africa’s favourite bird!

The green-and gold Cape Parrot is our national parrot and are only found here, yet most South Africans do not even know they exists. Our Cape Parrot is Africa’s most Endangered parrot species with around 1,000 Cape Parrots remaining in the wild. Their fate is forever linked to that of our declining yellowwood forests. The Cape Parrot Project works to save our national parrot by planting our national tree, the yellowwood…

Yellowwood seedlings grown by high school student, Justin Eberhardt, from Stutterheim. (Justin Eberhardt)
Yellowwood seedlings grown by high school student, Justin Eberhardt, from Stutterheim. (Justin Eberhardt)
Yellowwood saplings growing at one of the Cape Parrot Project planting sites along the Amathole Mountains in South Africa, home to the largest-remaining population of Cape parrots in the world... (Steve Boyes)
Yellowwood saplings growing at one of the Cape Parrot Project planting sites along the Amathole Mountains in South Africa, home to the largest-remaining population of Cape parrots in the world… (Steve Boyes)

The Cape Parrot is undoubtedly South Africa’s least-known “favourite bird” with a dedicated following across the globe. This beautiful parrot is uniting local communities in the idea that we can restore our grand yellowwood forests and bring back the 1,000-strong flocks of Cape Parrots. Make a small statement by voting for Africa’s most endangered parrot, the Cape Parrot, in this initiative run by Birdlife South Africa! Go to: http://birdlife.org.za/vote and scroll down to “Cape Parrot”…

Here is a series of recent Cape Parrot photographs by our project photographer, Rodnick Biljon, to share with your friends! Simply stunning! Vote now!

Cape Parrot (Rodnick Biljon)  Cape Parrot (Rodnick Biljon) Cape Parrot (Rodnick Biljon)Cape Parrot (Rodnick Biljon) Cape Parrot (Rodnick Biljon)Cape Parrot (Rodnick Biljon)

Changing Planet

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Steve Boyes has dedicated his life to conserving Africa's wilderness areas and the species that depend upon them. After having worked as a camp manager and wilderness guide in the Okavango Delta and doing his PhD field work on the little-known Meyer's Parrot, Steve took up a position as a Centre of Excellence Postdoctoral Fellow at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology. He has since been appointed the Scientific Director of the Wild Bird Trust and is a 2014 TED Fellow. His work takes him all over Africa, but his day-to-day activities are committed to South Africa's endemic and Critically Endangered Cape Parrot (Poicephalus robustus). Based in Hogsback Village in the Eastern Cape (South Africa), Steve runs the Cape Parrot Project, which aims to stimulate positive change for the species through high-quality research and community-based conservation action. When not in Hogsback, Steve can be found in the Okavango Delta where he explores remote areas of this wetland wilderness on "mokoros" or dug-out canoes to study endangered bird species in areas that are otherwise inaccessible. Steve is a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer for his work in the Okavango Delta and on the Cape Parrot Project.