Changing Planet

Winners of the 2015 FIPCOM Photojournalism Contest

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2nd edition of the Fujairah International Photojournalism International Competition (FIPCOM), organized in partnership with AFP agency and National Geographic France.

 

GRAND PRIZE WINNER 

Daniel Berehulak – Ebola

(Photo above)

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa first reported in March 2014 and believed by scientists to have started in late December with the death of a two-year–old boy, thought to have contracted the virus from bats in the remote Guinean village of Meliandou, has rapidly become the deadliest occurrence of the disease since its discovery in 1976.

The current epidemic sweeping across West Africa has now killed more than all other known Ebola outbreaks combined. Over 9,000 people had been reported as having died from the disease in six countries: Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, the U.S. and Mali. The total number of reported cases is more than 23,000. Whilst numbers are in decline in Liberia, the epidemic is still far from over in Sierra Leone and Guinea.

 

NEWS REPORT

Mauricio Lima – The cost of the human war in Ukraine

Starovarvarovka, Ukraine - May 16, 2014: Nadezhda Sanzharevskaya, 49, mourns her sister Yelena Ott, 42, at the back of a truck as her coffin is driven through farms to the cemetery for burial in the small village of Starovarvarovka, eastern Ukraine. According to Yelena Ott husband, Alexander, she was shot near a check point about three kilometers away of her home after being stopped by Ukrainian soldiers, currently under operation against pro-Russian militants in the surroundings of Kramatorsk. CREDIT: Photo by Mauricio Lima for The New York Times
Starovarvarovka, Ukraine – May 16, 2014: Nadezhda Sanzharevskaya, 49, mourns her sister Yelena Ott, 42, at the back of a truck as her coffin is driven through farms to the cemetery for burial in the small village of Starovarvarovka, eastern Ukraine. According to Yelena Ott’s husband, Alexander, she was shot near a check point about three kilometers away from her home after being stopped by Ukrainian soldiers fighting pro-Russian militants in the area of Kramatorsk. CREDIT: Photo by Mauricio Lima for The New York Times

After the insurrection in Kiev’s Maidan Square, with the rising number of pro-Russian protesters and the creation of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic, instability, fear, and isolation became part of daily life in eastern Ukraine, especially in the densely populated Donetsk and Luhansk  regions. For almost six months in 2014, the photographer witnessed how sorrow was unfolding by the daily killing of civilians from indiscriminate shelling.

Following the annexation of Crimea by Russia in April, protesters occupying the Donetsk Oblast administrative building declared independence from Ukraine and held a referendum on separating from Ukraine, on May 11, 2014. The day after, Luhansk also proclaimed its sovereignty. As officials in Kiev did not recognize their independence, conflict escalated.

In July, tensions increased even higher after a passenger aircraft of Malaysia Airlines crashed across small villages near Grabovo.

In an act of defiant towards Kiev’s government, captured Ukrainian soldiers were paraded by rebels in central Donetsk’s Lenin Square during Ukraine’s Independence Day, the day before Irina Dovgan, a pro-Ukrainian activist, was displayed and humiliated by passers-by at a check point on the outskirts of the rebel-held city. With empty streets, closed shops, and a struggle to meet basic needs, the remaining residents, mostly elderly and children, were forced to shelter in basements, when not burying loved ones.

More than 5,000 people have been killed so far in the conflict and nearly one million people have fled their homes. The majority of the internally displaced people are elderly. Fighting continues in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, where many civilians are still unable to leave because of travel restrictions and indiscriminate shelling.

 

NEWS SINGLE

Baraa Al-Halibi – Aleppo

AFP PHOTO / BARAA AL-HALABI
AFP PHOTO / BARAA AL-HALABI

A man carries a young girl, injured in a reported barrel-bomb attack by government forces on June 3, 2014 in Kallaseh, district in the northern city of Aleppo. Some 2.000 civilians, including more than 500 children, have been killed in regime air strikes on rebel-held areas of Aleppo since January, many of them in barel bomb attacks

 

SPORTS REPORT

Alain Schroeder – Kushti

©ALAINSCHROEDER01
© Alain Schroeder

Kushti is the traditional form of Indian wrestling. In vogue during the 16th century Mughal era, this art is practiced in a type of gymnasium called an Akhara. Wearing only a well-adjusted loincloth (“langot”), wrestlers or “Pelwhans” enter a pit made of clay, often mixed with salt, lemon and ghee (clarified butter). This clay, representing Mother Earth is renewed every 2 years. Before every match, each wrestler covers the body of his adversary with this earth whose color varies by region (red in Kolhapur, yellow in Varanasi). During combat, the coated bodies meld with the color of the arena. The rule for winning is simple. Both shoulders must be pinned to the ground. It is strictly forbidden to strangle or throw punches, yet the swollen ears of seasoned wrestlers are testament to the vigorous contact.

 

SPORTS SINGLE

Gilad Kalaverchick – Turtle

©GILADKAVALERCHIK
© Gilad Kalaverchick

During the 28th Israeli triathlon championships a sea turtle dives under the three leading triathlon swimmers.

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The FIPCOM competition winner will receive a trophy and a 15,000 euro (U.S.$ 16,200) prize. Additional runners-up – one per topic – will receive 3,000 euros ($3,200). All winners will also receive a Nikon Coolpix A. Their work will be displayed in two exhibitions, one in the Arab World Institute I .M.A of Paris, the second in the Emirate of Fujairah.

Trained journalist Jean-Pierre Vrignaud, 49, started his career in the french dailies Ouest-France (regional) and Liberation (national) before working in magazines. He was copy editor for Rebondir magazine and books (careers and jobs), deputy editor-in-chief of Max Magazine (lifestyle for men), and a contributor to Science & avenir (pop science), Quo, 60 millions de consommateurs, L’entreprise en solo, Courrier Cadres, and Paris Match. In 2004, he joined Prismamedia for Ça M’intéresse Magazine, and was in charge of the Culture sections. In 2010, he took part in the launch of the magazine Ça M’intéresse Histoire, where he now holds the post of Deputy Editor-in-Chief. In September 2013, he was also named editor-in-chief of National Geographic France.

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