Wildlife

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #76

WBT logoThis is the 76th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” and represents one of the best wild bird photograph collections we have ever seen. This is a testament to how far this community has come and how much effort all of the contributing photographers and enthusiasts have to put in. We need your help to achieve our world-changing target of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts celebrating the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild. These beautiful images unite us as one blue-green living planet. Share your favourite wild bird photographs, invite your friends to join, grab some binoculars and your camera, and support global bird conservation by donating to the Wild Bird Trust

Please help us continue our work by donating to the Wild Bird Trust: http://www.wildbirdtrust.com/donations/ Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website to learn more about our research and conservation projects in Africa. Your wild bird photographs can now be submitted at: www.wildbirdtrust.com/top25 Include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos.

Crested serpent eagles are found in forested habitats across tropical Asia and are spread across a wide range across the Indian Subcontinent, SE Asia and E Asia. (Agniprava Nath)
Crested serpent eagles are found in forested habitats across tropical Asia and are spread across a wide range across the Indian Subcontinent, SE Asia and E Asia. (Agniprava Nath)
Streak-throated woodpeckers are little-known woodpeckers ound throughout the Indian Subcontinent. (Arindam Saha)
Streak-throated woodpeckers are little-known woodpeckers ound throughout the Indian Subcontinent. (Arindam Saha)
Pied kingfishers are found widely distributed across Africa and Asia with their black-and-white plumage, crest and the habit of hovering over clear lakes and rivers before diving for fish being diagnostic. (Bidyut De)
Pied kingfishers are found widely distributed across Africa and Asia with their black-and-white plumage, crest and the habit of hovering over clear lakes and rivers before diving for fish being diagnostic. (Bidyut De)
Purple sunbirds are resident breeders in thin forest and gardens within dense urban areas across West Asia through to the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia. (Bidyut Kumar De)
Purple sunbirds are resident breeders in thin forest and gardens within dense urban areas across West Asia through to the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia. (Bidyut Kumar De)
Carmine bee-eaters occur across sub-equatorial Africa, ranging from KwaZulu-Natal and Namibia to Gabon, E Democratic Republic of the Congo and Kenya. (Brendon Cremer)
Carmine bee-eaters occur across sub-equatorial Africa, ranging from KwaZulu-Natal and Namibia to Gabon, E Democratic Republic of the Congo and Kenya. (Brendon Cremer)
Taiga flycatchers are found in the taiga forests of N Eurasia from E Russia to Siberia and Mongolia, wintering  in S and SE Asia in the Indian Subcontinent, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Malaysia, Thailand, China, Vietnam, and Japan. (Chandan Hazra)
Taiga flycatchers are found in the taiga forests of N Eurasia from E Russia to Siberia and Mongolia, wintering in S and SE Asia in the Indian Subcontinent, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Malaysia, Thailand, China, Vietnam, and Japan. (Chandan Hazra)
Pied harriers are migratory, breeding from the Amur Valley in E Russia and NE China to North Korea and wintering as far S as Pakistan to Philippines. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Pied harriers are migratory, breeding from the Amur Valley in E Russia and NE China to North Korea and wintering as far S as Pakistan to Philippines. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Indian skimmers are found on large rivers and lakes, swamps and coastal wetlands in parts of Pakistan in the Indus river system of Kashmir and northern and central India along the Ganges,[7] Bangladesh and Burma and formerly occurred in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. (PS Anand)
Indian skimmers are found on large rivers and lakes, swamps and coastal wetlands in parts of Pakistan in the Indus river system of Kashmir and northern and central India along the Ganges,[7] Bangladesh and Burma and formerly occurred in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. (PS Anand)
Grey-crowned cranes occur in the dry savannah bushveld across Africa S of the Sahara. They are also be found in marshes, cultivated lands and grassy flatlands near rivers and lakes in E Africa from Uganda and Kenya to South Africa. (Rodnick Biljon)
Grey-crowned cranes occur in the dry savannah bushveld across Africa S of the Sahara. They are also be found in marshes, cultivated lands and grassy flatlands near rivers and lakes in E Africa from Uganda and Kenya to South Africa. (Rodnick Biljon)
Brown fish owls are found in the warm, subtropical and humid parts of continental Asia and some offshore islands with a range of over 7,000 km from E China to Palestine. (Gopal Prasad)
Brown fish owls are found in the warm, subtropical and humid parts of continental Asia and some offshore islands with a range of over 7,000 km from E China to Palestine. (Gopal Prasad)
Fire-tailed sunbirds are found in the temperate, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests in the N parts of the Indian Subcontinent, primarily in the Himalayas, and also in some adjoining regions in SE Asia. They are recorded in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand and Tibet. (Debapratim Saha)
Fire-tailed sunbirds are found in the temperate, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests in the N parts of the Indian Subcontinent, primarily in the Himalayas, and also in some adjoining regions in SE Asia. They are recorded in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand and Tibet. (Debapratim Saha)
Osprey are adapted to a wide variety of habitat types, nesting in any location near a body of water providing an adequate food supply on all continents (except Antarctica). (Faiz Rehman)
Purple sunbirds are resident breeders in thin forest and gardens within dense urban areas across West Asia through to the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Purple sunbirds are resident breeders in thin forest and gardens within dense urban areas across West Asia through to the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Ruddy shelducks are found predominantly in SE Europe and across central Asia to SE Asia with small, isolated populations in NW Africa and Ethiopia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Ruddy shelducks are found predominantly in SE Europe and across central Asia to SE Asia with small, isolated populations in NW Africa and Ethiopia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Rainbow lorikeets are common along the E seaboard of Australia from N Queensland to S Australia and Tasmania, preferring rainforest, coastal bush and woodland areas.  (Lennart Hessel)
Rainbow lorikeets are common along the E seaboard of Australia from N Queensland to S Australia and Tasmania, preferring rainforest, coastal bush and woodland areas. (Lennart Hessel)
Sarus cranes are the tallest flying bird and are a non-migratory crane species found in the Indian Subcontinent, SE Asia and Australia. (Nandhini Raveendran)
Sarus cranes are the tallest flying bird and are a non-migratory crane species found in the Indian Subcontinent, SE Asia and Australia. (Nandhini Raveendran)
Burchell's coucals are known locally as the "rain bird" and are a cuckoo species found throughout SubSaharan Africa. (Nobby Clarke)
Burchell’s coucals are known locally as the “rain bird” and are a cuckoo species found throughout SubSaharan Africa. (Nobby Clarke)
Red-legged honeycreepers are found in the tropical New World from S Mexico south to Peru, Bolivia and central Brazil, Trinidad and Tobago, and on Cuba (where possibly introduced). Photographed here in Costa Rica. (Mauro Roman)
Red-legged honeycreepers are found in the tropical New World from S Mexico south to Peru, Bolivia and central Brazil, Trinidad and Tobago, and on Cuba (where possibly introduced). Photographed here in Costa Rica. (Mauro Roman)
Swee waxbills are endemic to S Africa and are mostly found on the edges of established woodlands at higher altitudes. (Sally Westaway Walmsley)
Swee waxbills are endemic to S Africa and are mostly found on the edges of established woodlands at higher altitudes. (Sally Westaway Walmsley)
Rufous-necked hornbills have a range now restricted to NE India, Bhutan, Burma, SE Tibet, N and W Thailand, N Laos and N Vietnam. (Sourajit Ghosh)
Rufous-necked hornbills have a range now restricted to NE India, Bhutan, Burma, SE Tibet, N and W Thailand, N Laos and N Vietnam. (Sourajit Ghosh)
Oriental white-eyes are resident breeders in open woodland in tropical Asia from the Indian subcontinent to SE Asia, extending to Indonesia and Malaysia. (Sourajit Ghosh)
Oriental white-eyes are resident breeders in open woodland in tropical Asia from the Indian subcontinent to SE Asia, extending to Indonesia and Malaysia. (Sourajit Ghosh)
Laughing kookaburras are indigenous to E Australia, but have been introduced to New Zealand, Tasmania and Western Australia. (Sjoerd van Berge Henegouwen)
Laughing kookaburras are indigenous to E Australia, but have been introduced to New Zealand, Tasmania and Western Australia. (Sjoerd van Berge Henegouwen)
King penguins are the second largest penguin and breed on the subantarctic islands at the N reaches of Antarctica, South Georgia, and other temperate islands in the region. (Sjoerd van Berge Henegouwen)
King penguins are the second largest penguin and breed on the subantarctic islands at the N reaches of Antarctica, South Georgia, and other temperate islands in the region. (Sjoerd van Berge Henegouwen)
Australian brushturkeys are found in E Australia from Far North Queensland to Illawarra in New South Wales. (Sjoerd van Berge Henegouwen)
Australian brushturkeys are found in E Australia from Far North Queensland to Illawarra in New South Wales. (Sjoerd van Berge Henegouwen)
White-bellied blue flycatchers are endemic to the dense forests S from Mahabaleshwar through the W Ghats all the way to the Nilgiris Hills. (Pranesh Kodancha)
White-bellied blue flycatchers are endemic to the dense forests S from Mahabaleshwar through the W Ghats all the way to the Nilgiris Hills. (Pranesh Kodancha)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. Our blue-green living planet has seen cataclysms like us before and has always come back after the threat has subsided. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivery brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Bird Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Bird Revolution!!

The Wild Bird Trust would like to thank Swarovski Optik for helping to make the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” a possibility! Go to the new Wild BirdTrust website for a chance to WIN a pair of amazing Swarovski binoculars by donating $10!

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #75″:

http://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2015/01/28/top-25-wild-bird-photographs-of-the-week-75/

Steve Boyes has dedicated his life to conserving Africa's wilderness areas and the species that depend upon them. After having worked as a camp manager and wilderness guide in the Okavango Delta and doing his PhD field work on the little-known Meyer's Parrot, Steve took up a position as a Centre of Excellence Postdoctoral Fellow at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology. He has since been appointed the Scientific Director of the Wild Bird Trust and is a 2014 TED Fellow. His work takes him all over Africa, but his day-to-day activities are committed to South Africa's endemic and Critically Endangered Cape Parrot (Poicephalus robustus). Based in Hogsback Village in the Eastern Cape (South Africa), Steve runs the Cape Parrot Project, which aims to stimulate positive change for the species through high-quality research and community-based conservation action. When not in Hogsback, Steve can be found in the Okavango Delta where he explores remote areas of this wetland wilderness on "mokoros" or dug-out canoes to study endangered bird species in areas that are otherwise inaccessible. Steve is a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer for his work in the Okavango Delta and on the Cape Parrot Project.
  • Deepak Bhalla

    Awesome Pictures. Worth preserving.

  • Deepak Bhalla

    Awesome pictures. Worth Preserving

  • Estelle Sebastiao Sauer

    You have all done us proud!! Thanks for sharing this with all and for humbling us once again…. Nature in all it’s glory! x

  • tarun sircar

    Hi . Saw the amazing pictures of birds and was amazed at the sheer variety and brilliance of the visuals . My son loves to take pictures of birds . Was wondering whether he could join and contribute his pictures as well ? Who does he need to contact ?

  • r

    this is a very beautifull birds and this photos is aaa avesome and this bird photos very detaily and im bow nex to this photographers

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