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The Hazards of Growing Up on Treasure Island: One of the Most Beautiful Places on Earth

by Desmond Meagley Some residents who live on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay are concerned about exposure to toxins, because many areas on the island have been marked as radioactive. While officials at the California Environmental Protection Agency have not currently identified unsafe levels of contamination in homes on the island, young people who...

by Desmond Meagley

Some residents who live on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay are concerned about exposure to toxins, because many areas on the island have been marked as radioactive. While officials at the California Environmental Protection Agency have not currently identified unsafe levels of contamination in homes on the island, young people who live there still worry about potential health risks.

Produced by: Ike Sriskandarajah, Teresa Chin
Filmed by: Luis Flores, Chaz Hubbard
Edited by: Luis Flores
Music by: Luis Flores

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Youth Radio Investigates is an NSF-supported science reporting series in which young journalists collect and analyze original data with professional scientists, and then tell unexpected stories about what they discover. National Geographic News Watch partners with Youth Radio to share the work of the young journalists with the National Geographic audience. Check out more from Youth Radio’s science desk at http://www.youthradio.org/oldsite/nsf/index.shtml