Changing Planet

Five Days, 390 Miles, One Planet in Need, and a Whole Lot of Bicycles

National Geographic’s Climate Ride Team (Photo courtesy Valerie Craig)

I’m headed to Bar Harbor, Maine this week as part of National Geographic’s newly-formed bike team to participate in Climate Ride Northeast. This five-day, 390-mile journey from Bar Harbor, Maine to Boston, Massachusetts is one of six multi-day rides and hikes that raise much-needed financial support for more than a hundred organizations working towards a sustainable future, while at the same time raising awareness and engaging individuals on climate-related issues.

Climate Ride is a nonprofit organization that organizes life-changing charitable events to raise awareness and support sustainability, active transportation, and environmental causes. Participants in Climate Ride events (hikes too!) are helping to provide much-needed financial support, raising awareness, engaging other humans, and helping to build a national network of supporters. The reward? The experience of a lifetime through some of America’s most beautiful landscapes. Participants meet and network with leaders in sustainability, renewable energy, and environmental causes while raising awareness of our cause.

On Thursday, September 17, we will pedal from iconic Bar Harbor through Acadia National Park, and along Maine’s rocky coast, dotted with quaint harbor towns, lighthouses, and wild blueberry patches. The next two days will be spent pedaling along Maine’s scenic mid-coast region with amazing riding and terrific stops along the way including Portland, Maine’s largest city and a bustling port town. The fourth day pedals through classic Maine as we pass through the towns of Kennebunk, Wells, Ogunquit, and York, before riding along some of New Hampshire’s 18 miles of scenic shoreline. The final day is a beautiful ride in Massachusetts where we will retrace, in reverse, Paul Revere’s famous midnight ride of 1775.

Interested in tracking the Nat Geo team’s progress? You can follow us with #climateride on FacebookInstagram and Twitter, and we’ll be sharing photos and video on Nat Geo’s Snapchat account on Thursday, Sept. 17.

Valerie Craig is Deputy to the Chief Scientist and Vice President of Operating Programs for National Geographic Society. She has strategic and operational oversight for the series of flagship programs and projects that are helping to achieve the Society's ambitious targets to deliver on the vision. She previously worked on ocean and freshwater issues for National Geographic's Impact Initiatives and Explorer Programs and oversaw the Lindblad-National Geographic Fund. Prior to joining NGS in May 2011, Valerie led TRAFFIC North America’s marine fisheries trade work, focusing on issues of legality and traceability in the seafood supply chain. Valerie earned a Master's of Environmental Management from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and has a Bachelor’s in International Relations.

About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

Social Media