Chat With Legendary Wildlife Photographers

giving-tuesday

Join Dereck and Beverly Joubert for a live Facebook chatDecember 1, from 12-1 p.m. EST.

(Photo by Beverly Joubert/National Geographic Creative)
With Dereck shooting video and Beverly on stills, the Jouberts have captured unforgettably eye-opening scenes of the lives of big cats for more than a quarter century. (Photo by Beverly Joubert/National Geographic Creative)

Big cats used to be everywhere.

So did dinosaurs.

We may never get to see dinosaurs as living, breathing creatures, but we can still see, hear, smell, and feel the incredible power and beauty of the cats. That’s something to be thankful for.

Something else to be thankful for is the existence of people like Dereck and Beverly Joubert, who have dedicated their lives to recording and protecting Africa’s rapidly shrinking big cat populations. Their films and photographs have inspired millions, and the Big Cats Initiative they helped found has supported dozens of conservation projects on the ground throughout Africa and Asia. In the video below, you can see the impact those projects are having.

Join Dereck and Beverly for a live chat on the Nat Geo Facebook page Tuesday, December 1, from 12-1 p.m. EST. Ask them about their lives in the wild, the lions and leopards they have come to know so well, or the work of the other researchers and conservationists supported by the Big Cats Initiative.

Then, show your appreciation of wildlife and the work of conservationists and filmmakers around the world by including the Big Cats Initiative and the whole National Geographic Society in your #GivingTuesday giving-back.

We share the Earth with amazing creatures. Let’s keep it that way.

(Photo by Beverly Joubert/National Geographic Creative)
A young adult male lion, healthy, strong, and ready to make his mark in his world. (Photo by Beverly Joubert/National Geographic Creative)

Join Dereck and Beverly Joubert for a live Facebook chatDecember 1, from 12-1 p.m. EST.

Support the Big Cats Initiative and the whole National Geographic Society.

[Updated 12/1/2015]

Human Journey

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Andrew Howley is a longtime contributor to the National Geographic blog, with a particular focus on archaeology and paleoanthropology generally, and ancient rock art in particular. In 2018 he became Communications Director at Adventure Scientists, founded by Nat Geo Explorer Gregg Treinish. Over 11 years at the National Geographic Society, Andrew worked in various ways to share the stories of NG explorers and grantees online. He also produced the Home Page of nationalgeographic.com for several years, and helped manage the Society's Facebook page during its breakout year of 2010. He studied Anthropology with a focus on Archaeology from the College of William & Mary in Virginia. He has covered expeditions with NG Explorers-in-Residence Mike Fay, Enric Sala, and Lee Berger. His personal interests include painting, running, and reading about history. You can follow him on Twitter @anderhowl and on Instagram @andrewjhowley.