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Sharks and Whale Song in the South Pacific

Not being at the top of the food chain is a wonderful thing when we are diving because it means that there are plenty of sharks around us. We love sharks because of their beauty, power, and the way they move—but most of all we love them because hosting a good number of sharks shows...

The incredibly expressive and territorial grey reef sharks accompany us on every dive here at Beveridge Reef. (Photo by Manu San Felix)

Not being at the top of the food chain is a wonderful thing when we are diving because it means that there are plenty of sharks around us.

We love sharks because of their beauty, power, and the way they move—but most of all we love them because hosting a good number of sharks shows that the reef is healthy.

Grey reef sharks are always up close and personal with the Pristine Seas team on the remote Beveridge Reef. (Photo by Manu San Felix)
Grey reef sharks are always up close and personal with the Pristine Seas team on the remote Beveridge Reef. (Photo by Manu San Felix)

The ocean ecosystem needs top predators: they maintain marine ecosystems in healthy condition since they feed on old and sick prey, improving prey population fitness (survival of the fittest!). Also, top predators maintain balance in marine ecosystems by keeping populations of lower food levels in check. We know now that removing top predators causes drastic ecosystem changes with negative consequences for fisheries and other important ecosystem services for humans.

Not only do we join sharks on every dive here at Beveridge Reef—up to eighty grey reef sharks at a time—but we are also accompanied by the best diving music in the world: whale song! Humpback whales are in these waters calving and their evocative song, which is powerful enough to travel miles at sea, literally courses through our bodies. It’s perfect diving: doing science research and filming with sharks whilst being gently shaken by whale song!

Have a listen for yourself:

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Life Aboard With Pristine Seas

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Meet the Author

Paul Rose
Paul Rose is an ardent explorer, television presenter, journalist, author, and Vice President of the Royal Geographical Society, and an Expedition Leader on the Pristine Seas team.