In Good Standing at Standing Rock

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Amy Gulick 

Standing Rock, ND | December 1, 2016

I came to listen. To the elders, water protectors, and silent prayers.

I came to learn. About strength of ceremony, compassion and community, and power of peaceful resistance.

I came to know. That generosity comes in many forms, all blood is red, and water is life.

I came to sense. A deep awakening, rising spirit, and ancestral wisdom.

I came to give. Resources, resolve, and respect.

I came to stand.

Amy Gulick is a Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers. She respectfully thanks the Standing Rock Sioux for allowing her to be a guest on their land and sharing their values and way of life.

©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com Water protectors stand in a peaceful ceremonial circle on Highway 1806 just south of where Backwater Bridge crosses Cantapeta Creek. Armed police have blockaded the bridge with concrete barriers, razor wire, and vehicles.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
Water protectors stand in a peaceful ceremonial circle on Highway 1806 just south of where Backwater Bridge crosses Cantapeta Creek. Armed police have blockaded the bridge with concrete barriers, razor wire, and vehicles.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com The Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Cannonball River, where thousands have come to support the Standing Rock Sioux, is a ceremonial camp in a constant state of prayer.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
The Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Cannonball River, where thousands have come to support the Standing Rock Sioux, is a ceremonial camp in a constant state of prayer.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
Water protectors gather at Cantapeta Creek near the base of Turtle Island, a sacred area to the Standing Rock Sioux containing ancestral burial sites. Armed police and vehicles occupy the top of the island.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com A volunteer construction crew builds a winter shelter at Oceti Sakowin Camp. Thousands of people have come here in support of the Standing Rock Sioux to protect the source of their drinking water.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
A volunteer construction crew builds a winter shelter at Oceti Sakowin Camp. Thousands of people have come here in support of the Standing Rock Sioux to protect the source of their drinking water.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com Armed police have blockaded the Backwater Bridge across Cantapeta Creek, preventing travel on Highway 1806 between Cannon Ball and Bismarck, North Dakota. Construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline northeast of the bridge is slated to tunnel beneath the Missouri River upstream from the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, posing potential threats to the tribe's drinking water.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
Armed police have blockaded the Backwater Bridge across Cantapeta Creek, preventing travel on Highway 1806 between Cannon Ball and Bismarck, North Dakota. Construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline northeast of the bridge is slated to tunnel beneath the Missouri River upstream from the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, posing potential threats to the tribe’s drinking water.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com The ceremonial Oceti Sakowin Camp at night. Armed police, flood lights, and barricades occupy nearby lands sacred to the Standing Rock Sioux.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
The ceremonial Oceti Sakowin Camp at night. Armed police, flood lights, and barricades occupy nearby lands sacred to the Standing Rock Sioux.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com       Armed police and vehicles occupy the top of Turtle Island, a sacred site to the Standing Rock Sioux. Water protectors gather at the base of the island to pray to their ancestors. The Dakota Access oil pipeline is being constructed just beyond Turtle Island, and is currently routed to tunnel beneath the Missouri River upstream of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of supporters from all over the world are stationed in nearby encampments to protect the source of the tribe’s drinking water.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com      
Armed police and vehicles occupy the top of Turtle Island, a sacred site to the Standing Rock Sioux. Water protectors gather at the base of the island to pray to their ancestors. The Dakota Access oil pipeline is being constructed just beyond Turtle Island, and is currently routed to tunnel beneath the Missouri River upstream of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of supporters from all over the world are stationed in nearby encampments to protect the source of the tribe’s drinking water.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com Flags at Oceti Sakowin Camp represent more than 300 indigenous groups in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux and their efforts to protect their drinking water.
©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
Flags at Oceti Sakowin Camp represent more than 300 indigenous groups in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux and their efforts to protect their drinking water.
Map created by Carl Sack
Map created by Carl Sack (Click to enlarge)

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The mission of the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) is to further environmental and cultural conservation through photography. iLCP is a Fellowship of more than 100 photographers from all around the globe. As a project based organization, iLCP coordinates Conservation Photography Expeditions to get world-renowned photographers in the field teamed with scientists, writers, videographers and conservation groups to gather visual assets that are used to create conservation communications campaigns to foment conservation successes. iLCP is a 501 (c) (3) organization. Support our work at this link.