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Stream live Tonight 6:30pm EST: The Megatransect – reflections on a wilderness journey

Watch a live presentation tonight of a historic wilderness journey, video streaming tonight direct from National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C., beginning 6:30pm EST Tuesday, Jan. 9 .  Access through this link to Facebook Live OR this link to Livestream. Twenty years ago, conservationist Mike Fay led a team on a more than 3,000-mile grueling trek from the Republic of...

top image: Michael Fay sits behind author David Quammen on a boat trip.  ABOVE IMAGE: Michael Fay, second in crossing and other expedition members make their way acr oss the Ivindo River, near Kongou Falls. Here they set up a camp on a sandbar. Photographs by Michael Nichols.

Watch a live presentation tonight of a historic wilderness journey, video streaming tonight direct from National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C., beginning 6:30pm EST Tuesday, Jan. 9 .  Access through this link to Facebook Live OR this link to Livestream.

Twenty years ago, conservationist Mike Fay led a team on a more than 3,000-mile grueling trek from the Republic of the Congo to the Atlantic Ocean coast in Gabon, through Africa’s largest stretch of continuous rain forest. The undertaking—dubbed the Megatransect—was so massive National Geographic published three articles to adequately tell its story, documented by award-winning photographer Nick Nichols and writer David Quammen. Mike and his team created a comprehensive database of environmental information they shared with Gabon’s president, leading to the creation of 13 national parks in Gabon and significant U.S. funding to protect the Congo Basin.

Join Mike, Nick, David, and others as they reflect on an arduous expedition that tested the limits of human endurance and was a monumental turning point in conservation, inspiring other bold initiatives—including National Geographic’s Okavango Wilderness Project and Pristine Seas—to meticulously explore and document the globe’s wildest and least-understood places to show governments why they deserve our protection.

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