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This might look like an unusually colourful Cape Parrot, but the yellow feathers indicate trouble for this bird... and for the species. The entire population in the Amatole region, and maybe beyond, carries the virus that causes Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease. A high-fat diet of exotic nuts prevents starvation but lowers the birds' resistance to the deadly symptoms. For a species already facing multiple threats, this viral time bomb is the last thing they need - making the research and conservation efforts of the Cape Parrot Project crucial to their survival. Follow the CPP page to connect! Photo by Cassie Carstens...

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Meet the Author

Author Photo Steve Boyes
Steve Boyes has dedicated his life to conserving Africa's wilderness areas and the species that depend upon them. After having worked as a camp manager and wilderness guide in the Okavango Delta and doing his PhD field work on the little-known Meyer's Parrot, Steve took up a position as a Centre of Excellence Postdoctoral Fellow at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology. He has since been appointed the Scientific Director of the Wild Bird Trust and is a 2014 TED Fellow. His work takes him all over Africa, but his day-to-day activities are committed to South Africa's endemic and Critically Endangered Cape Parrot (Poicephalus robustus). Based in Hogsback Village in the Eastern Cape (South Africa), Steve runs the Cape Parrot Project, which aims to stimulate positive change for the species through high-quality research and community-based conservation action. When not in Hogsback, Steve can be found in the Okavango Delta where he explores remote areas of this wetland wilderness on "mokoros" or dug-out canoes to study endangered bird species in areas that are otherwise inaccessible. Steve is a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer for his work in the Okavango Delta and on the Cape Parrot Project.