More ocean acidification, less coral?

Co-authored by Erica Cirino Scientists have known for about 15 years that ocean acidification has made it more difficult for hard corals and shelled marine organisms to survive. To grow, hard corals as well as clams, oysters, and others pull calcium ...

Ocean Acidification from Domestic to International

  Since the industrial revolution began, we have released 2 trillion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere, and about one-third of it went into the ocean. We initially thought that the ocean taking up CO2 was a good thing – ...

Reports: Ocean Acidification Heats Planet, Changes Ecosystems

Two new studies showcase the greater dangers of rising ocean temperatures. The first, in the journal Nature Climate Change, finds rising carbon dioxide levels that make oceans more acidic can also raise global temperatures. The authors find ocean acidification would ...

Reports: Ocean Acidification Heats Planet, Changes Ecosystems

Two new studies showcase the greater dangers of rising ocean temperatures. The first, in the journal Nature Climate Change, finds rising carbon dioxide levels that make oceans more acidic can also raise global temperatures. The authors find ocean acidification would ...

Strong Evidence for Ocean Acidification Impacts in Southern Ocean

For years, researchers have warned that the increasing acidity of the oceans is likely to create a whole host of problems for the marine environment. Most of these warnings were predictions for future decades as well as theories about possible ...

Ocean Acidification: It’s Time to Act

“The cost of responding to ocean acidification may be substantial, but it is still far less than the costs of inaction” — Bill Ruckelshaus, co-chair Washington Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification, November 27, 2012 Consensus is hard. Any time you bring together ...

Ocean Acidification Threatens Food Webs, 150 Scientists Warn

NASA We hear a lot about how carbon dioxide emissions are warming the atmosphere and changing climate in ways that are damaging, if not catastrophic, for life on Earth. Increasingly we are also learning about the impact of ...

March for the Oceans; Make A Splash!

By Carl Safina and Sylvia Earle When the first World Oceans Day was held in 1992, the oceans were very different than today. The oceans were less acidic because less carbon dioxide had dissolved into them. They were a little cooler ...

Submit for the Ocean Film Challenge!

Filmmakers have the power to change the trajectory of human life on our water planet — from destruction to revitalization! Submit a short film for the Ocean Film Challenge, 7 minutes or under, on the impact humans have on the ocean and ...