Photograph by Michael Nichols

Changing Planet

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This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow Peter Mather It is 1am as I drive down Alaska’s straightest and smoothest road. We are on our…

Changing Planet, Wildlife

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Survival International’s Sarah Shenker visits Guaviry; a Guarani community under siege in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.   Three gunshots. Bang, bang, bang.   The night was pitch black. It was impossible to know where the gunmen were.   “They’re sending a message,” Genito Guarani said. “They’re watching our every move.”   Like everyone at…

Changing Planet, Human Journey

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Students at Foulks Ranch Elementary School, with teacher and National Geographic Education Fellow Jim Bentley, completed the final phase of their Geo-Inquiry project to address the question, “How can we make water more accessible and reduce plastic waste in our parks and school?”. The students helped Cosumnes Community Services District park administrators install a bottle-filling station…

Changing Planet

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Solipsism is the belief in the idea that my self and my mind is the only thing that I can be certain of. If this is something people struggle with, then a path to overcoming it would be found in the last two days of the Explorers Festival. This past Saturday a main question was…

Changing Planet, Human Journey, Wildlife

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If yesterday was a day in which we focused on the connections and the connective tissue that we share by being part of this planet and thanks to our work at National Geographic, then today is the day that we identify some of the catalysts, some of the sparks, that will be ignited. On the…

Changing Planet, Human Journey, Wildlife

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We are always part of interrelated processes of momentary events. That is what one of my mentors in college used to explain to us, his students, during the Buddhist Philosophy course. He was teaching us about the interconnectivity of it all, according to a buddhist system of thought called abhidharma. Nothing is independent. Everything is interdependent….

Changing Planet, Human Journey, Wildlife

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By Marlene Cimons Brown anoles are one of the most successful species on the planet. These resilient creatures have settled throughout a large portion of the Western Hemisphere, even landing in such distant places as Hawaii and Singapore by hitching rides across the Pacific in shipments of ornamental plants. In the southeastern United States, they…

Changing Planet, Wildlife

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When I was growing up in Colombia I had the privilege of learning the art of how to be a diver. I became a skin diver amidst the coral reefs of San Andrés island, a scuba diver whilst exploring the crystal waters of Providencia Island, and I earned my advanced scuba license with one of…

Changing Planet

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Al crecer en Colombia tuve el privilegio de aprender el arte de cómo bucear. Usé mi snorkel entre los corales de la isla de San Andrés, buceé explorando las aguas de la isla de Providencia, y me convertí en buzo avanzado con uno de mis amigos de la niñez en Barú, cerca de Cartagena. Pero…

Changing Planet

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I have a theory. Taiwan’s waste management system is dependent on a subtle, strong, yet almost invisible force–women. Walk into a bathroom in any Taipei City subway stop and you’ll see an older woman in a bright green or orange vest moving seamlessly in and out of the stalls, a pair of tongs in hand….

Changing Planet, Human Journey

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You don’t have to live on the coast to be drawn to the breathtaking sights and sounds of the ocean. As essential to life on earth as it has been for millennia, the ocean covers about 70 percent of the planet, dictates the weather, feeds billions of people, stores 50 times more carbon dioxide than…

Changing Planet

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By Carl Safina and Sylvia Earle When the first World Oceans Day was held in 1992, the oceans were very different than today. The oceans were less acidic because less carbon dioxide had dissolved into them. They were a little cooler because the atmosphere was cooler. More large predatory fish like tunas and sharks existed,…

Changing Planet

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By: Erin Myers Madeira and Tyronne Garstone Aboriginal people have been managing the land in Australia for more than 50,000 years, and traditional practices like fire management have shaped the landscape. The decline of these practices over the last two centuries due to displacement of Indigenous people has caused the Kimberley region to suffer. Learn…

Changing Planet, Human Journey, Wildlife

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