Andrew Howley

You. Are. An. ANIMAL. Take that as a rock-musician-style compliment, a statement of the obvious, or an affront to whatever you think separates us as humans (language? mind? soul? denim?), but it’s the basic category of life on Earth that we all fall into. And we share that category with a practically limitless number of...

2016 has been an incredible year for exploration, research, and conservation—and explorers supported by the National Geographic Society have been at the top of each of those fields. In recent days, several of them have been awarded for their contributions by organizations around the world. Sarah Parcak, Space Archaeologist Using the incredible perspective offered by...

A Man and a Movement James Welch, like many Americans, was a child of multiple cultures. The Blackfeet of his father’s family and the Gros Ventre of his mother’s had different origins, but had come together by the 19th century in Montana, creating a rich cultural and linguistic background for following generations. Today, on what would have been his...

Kike Ballesteros has been the Pristine Seas team expert on coral and algae since the beginning. Now, diving on the current expedition to Niue Island, a raised coral atoll in the South Pacific, Kike reveals some of his most colorful and finely detailed images yet of the strange and beautiful creatures that call the bottom of the ocean...

If you spent a good amount of time studying, photographing, and protecting otters in the wild, how long do you think it would be before you saw an albino one? 10 years? 20? Try more like 40. Hans Ring is one of Sweden’s top wildlife photographers. He first began studying otters in the middle and...

By Amy Werner Today is World Fish Migration day, a day best celebrated by raising awareness of the importance of open rivers and migratory fish, exactly what Rock Creek Park did at a 2016 BioBlitz fish identification on May 20.  The urban oasis of Rock Creek Park in Washington D.C., is often viewed as containing only...

“Only about two percent of the ocean is currently protected,” says National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Enric Sala. “The rest is being disrupted by overfishing, pollution, climate change, and species extinctions. We need to do something to change that.” In this Weekly Wrap, an audio show that goes inside the minds of our photographers and staff,...

Time is running out for big cats. That’s the message of a new statue on display for just one day in London’s Trafalgar Square, commissioned by Nat Geo Wild and about to be auctioned to raise money for National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative. The gaunt frame, torn hide, and wide, harrowed eyes of the Clockwork Lion give a drastically...

Every day, the National Geographic Society advances our legacy of studying, exploring, and protecting the planet. And this year proved that there’s still so much left to explore—from discovering a new human ancestor deep in a South African cave to protecting some of the last wild places in the ocean. Watch our recap of captivating...

This week, comment to NatGeo on Facebook or Twitter with “#donate $10” and give your support to Pristine Seas. The ocean covers more than 70 percent of the surface of Earth, but only 2 percent of that is officially protected. National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala is exploring the ocean’s most untouched areas in hopes of raising that number to 10 percent....

Joel Sartore’s #PhotoArk images were broadcast onto St. Peter’s Basilica, December 8 at 1p.m. EST/6p.m. UTC. Follow @NatGeo on Periscope to see what he saw. With habitat loss, poaching, and climate change looming like a new flood to threaten the world’s animals with extinction, National Geographic photographer, Joel Sartore, gave himself a mission: photograph every captive animal species on...

The youth are not the future, they are here now. But they will have to deal with the ramifications of what happens now in the future. If they fail to speak out and raise awareness and enable action today, they stand to lose tomorrow to ignorance, apathy, and inaction. —Asher Jay, National Geographic Emerging Explorer...

The young and the old and all the in-between are gathering in Paris this week to make plans and commitments for combating climate change. While much of the anticipation is around whether there will be a big new binding agreement at the state level at the COP21 (Conference of Parties) meetings, much of the inspiration and action is...

Join Dereck and Beverly Joubert for a live Facebook chat, December 1, from 12-1 p.m. EST. Big cats used to be everywhere. So did dinosaurs. We may never get to see dinosaurs as living, breathing creatures, but we can still see, hear, smell, and feel the incredible power and beauty of the cats. That’s something to be thankful for. Something else...

Follow @OutofEdenWalk on Twitter and join Paul Salopek for a live chat from the trail Friday, November 13 at 1p.m EST.  Ask your questions using #EdenWalk. A few weeks ago in the Out of Eden Walk blog, as he was making his way across the Republic of Georgia on foot at three miles per hour as part of his worldwide...