Cara Brook

It always starts with a question: Teaching science in Madagascar

I wrote to you last as a Princeton doctoral student in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, where I studied the transmission dynamics of potentially zoonotic–or human-infecting–viruses carried by Malagasy fruit bats. Disease ecologists like myself use mathematical modeling tools to understand how pathogens persist in finite host populations over time–and to predict when such pathogens are most likely to pass from one individual to another. I wrapped up that PhD a few months ago and started a postdoctoral fellowship with the Miller Institute at UC Berkeley, but I’m still chasing answers to many of the same questions as before….

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Seeking an End to the Terror of Rabies in Madagascar

“Haromotana,” nods the nurse in the remote health clinic in western Madagascar. She’s only seen one case in her lifetime, but she remembers the incident from five years prior as though it happened only yesterday. She shudders slightly as she recalls the raving man who staggered into her clinic, mouth foaming, limbs thrashing, only further agitated by…

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My Fihavanana Malagasy: At Home on the Eighth Continent

Cara Brook is a Disease Ecologist working in the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton. She currently studies the great bats of Madagascar—flying foxes—and the diseases that they carry that could spill over into humans. Capturing and studying wild bats, of course, requires an ability to blend in to Malagasy culture in addition to the environment…

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Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (Mostly Madagascar!)

Cara Brook is a Disease Ecologist working in the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton. She currently studies the great bats of Madagascar—flying foxes—and the diseases that they carry that could spill over into humans. Capturing and studying wild bats, of course, requires an ability to blend in to Malagasy culture in addition to the environment…

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