Carl Safina

By Carl Safina and Sylvia Earle When the first World Oceans Day was held in 1992, the oceans were very different than today. The oceans were less acidic because less carbon dioxide had dissolved into them. They were a little cooler because the atmosphere was cooler. More large predatory fish like tunas and sharks existed,…

Changing Planet

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North Atlantic right whales are facing a breeding and survival crisis, due in large part to entanglements in fishing gear. Humpback whales are dying in unprecedented numbers off the Northeastern U.S., some are also casualties of entanglements while others have fatally collided with ships, and the causes of death of others are unknown. Vaquitas face…

Wildlife

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The United States Army Corps of Engineers is now fast-tracking the permitting for the proposed Pebble Mine, a giant open-pit and underground gold and copper mine in the headwaters of Bristol Bay, Alaska. The rivers of this vast watershed spawn North America’s largest remaining salmon populations and support thousands of fishing jobs, and a traditional…

Changing Planet

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By Shawn Heinrichs As young child growing up on the Wild Coast of South Africa, the ocean I knew was a very different place than the ocean we know now. The ocean of my childhood was vast and unfathomably bountiful, where billions of sardines migrated annually in shoals so vast and dense, that they turned…

Changing Planet

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By Erica Cirino In an opinion piece for the Cape Cod Times earlier this month, Carl Safina and I wrote about coexisting with coyotes—as millions of people in fact do. We juxtaposed a Cape Cod coyote-killing contest against a San Francisco newspaper deliveryman who every morning gives a particular coyote their own paper. That coyote…

Wildlife

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By Erica Cirino On Saturday morning I woke early to a bright, pink sunrise with just one thing on my mind: plastic. Last year I started speaking and giving workshops to young people and adults as a writer and artist covering stories of plastic pollution, science and solutions around the world. I have an upcoming…

Changing Planet

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By Jessica Perelman, Guest Blogger Exploring the deep ocean is by no means a simple task. It is the great frontier, the endless unknown about which we know so little. Broadly defined as the ocean and seafloor lying below 200 meters, the deep sea is by far the largest biome on Earth covering well over…

Changing Planet

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By Carl Safina Atlantic Bluefin tuna might be the best studied marine fish in the world. But counting Bluefin in the wild is difficult. They can live several decades and reach 1,500 pounds, and they migrate across the ocean. It’s been particularly difficult for western Atlantic Bluefin. (Eastern Atlantic and western Atlantic tuna are named…

Wildlife

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By Erica Cirino When young people in America are first introduced to the concept of climate change–and its effects on the oceans–it’s usually through science textbooks. And that’s if young people are taught about climate change at all—according to education organizations such as the National Center for Science Education, in some parts of the country,…

Changing Planet

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By Erica Cirino On November 1, 2016, I set out with a group of Danish sailors and scientists associated with nonprofit Plastic Change in an old-school sloop called the SY Christianshavn to cover more than 3,000 miles from Marina Del Ray, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, in search of plastic. The goal: cross the “Great Pacific…

Wildlife

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