Carrie Arnold

Listen: Singing Apes and More Animal Musicians

Silvery gibbons (Hylobates moloch) fill the Indonesian rain forests with sophisticated song—and now a new study shows how these melodies are linked to the evolution of human language. As one of the only nonhuman primates to rely on vocal ...

Crickets Lose Ability to Sing: “Evolution in Action”

Ten years ago male crickets on the Hawaiian islands of Oahu and Kauai began to fall mysteriously silent, and now scientists have discovered why. The culprit is a parasitic fly, relatively new to the region, that’s attracted to the ...

Spider Disguises Itself as Bird Droppings

It’s the ultimate crappy disguise: The spider Cyclosa ginnaga hides from predators by looking like a pile of bird feces, a new study says. Study leader I.-Min Tso, an entomologist at National Chung Hsing University in Taiwan, first ...

Emerald Lizard Discovered in Ecuador

A new species of lizard with a brilliant emerald head is the new jewel of Ecuador. Alopoglossus viridiceps is the first species of shade lizard found at the Santa Lucia Cloud Forest Reserve, in the Western Andes near Quito. “It’...

24 New Wasp Species Mummify Their Prey

Twenty-four new species of wasp that make mummies out of their prey have been discovered in the cloud forests of Ecuador, a new study says.  The parasitic Aleiodes wasps deposit their eggs inside a caterpillar, and when the babies hatch, ...

Cartwheeling Spider Found, Inspires New Robot

Forget fight or flight—a new species of spider discovered in Morocco flips its way out of danger. Called the flic-flac spider after its signature back handspring move, Cebrennus rechenbergi can easily somersault along the sand dunes of the country’...

Why Does a Decomposing Whale Explode?

The small town of Trout River, Newfoundland, has a big problem: a dead blue whale stranded on one of its beaches. Experts are scrambling to find a way to dispose of the 380,000-pound (170,000-kilogram) corpse before gases generated by its ...

Hostile Female Spiders Eat Males Before Mating

Call it the ultimate femme fatale: Scientists have found that aggressive female burrowing wolf spiders (Lycosa hispanica) eat males before having sex with them. For many spiders, mating is a risky proposal. Not only are they exposed to predators while ...

What’s Making Duck Sounds in the Ocean? Mystery Solved

It may sound quacky, but mysterious duck-like sounds in the oceans are made by whales, a new study says. Scientists have been trying to decode the perplexing low-frequency sounds, which occur every winter in the Southern Hemisphere in the ocean ...

New Killer Sponges Found in the Deep Sea

Four new species of meat-eating sponges have been discovered deep in the waters off California, a new study says. There are about 8,500 species of sponges, a type of simple, mostly stationary invertebrate, and the vast majority passively filter their food ...

Monarch Butterflies Shrink, Get Paler After Skipping a Meal

Brilliantly colored monarch butterflies literally are what they eat—and missing even one meal can be harmful, a new study says. New experiments show that the insects‘ vibrant colors are the result of a good diet as larvae—and that ...

New Species: Pink-and-Yellow Frog With Spikes

High in the remote mountains of Vietnam, scientists have found a “striking” new species of pink-and-yellow frog covered with sharp spikes. Jodi Rowley, an expert on Southeast Asian amphibians, had never seen a frog with such spiny skin, and neither ...

“Strange” New Frog Found in Swimming Pool

A few weeks ago, a boy in eastern Colombia found more than just fun in his swimming pool—he discovered a new species of frog. The 1.5-inch-long (4-centimeter-long) frog “is rather strange-looking—it’s quite fat with short legs and ...

“Strange” New Frog Found in Swimming Pool

A few weeks ago, a boy in eastern Colombia found more than just fun in his swimming pool—he discovered a new species of frog. The 1.5-inch-long (4-centimeter-long) frog “is rather strange-looking—it’s quite fat with short legs and ...

Invasive Pythons Can Find Home 20 Miles Away, Study Says

For Burmese pythons, there’s no place like home—and now a new study shows the snakes can navigate from over 20 miles (36 kilometers) away to get there. At up to 18.8 feet (5.7 meters) long, Burmese pythons are among the world’s ...