Deirdre Leowinata

A New USAID-funded Community-based Conservation Initiative Launches in Northern Tanzania

Several years ago, the African People & Wildlife Fund integrated rangeland management into its four-step process towards long-term conservation success in Tanzania. Recently, a collaboration of ten organizations kicked off a five-year project to ensure that Tanzania’s rangelands, ecosystems, and the communities within those ecosystems, are protected.  By the African People & Wildlife Fund Wildlife…

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A Big Year for African Wildlife: Seven Milestones of 2015

With the closing of 2015 comes the end of a big chapter for Africa and its spectacular wildlife. Looking back on the year, we reflect on the big wins and big changes for wildlife conservation in this huge, unique continent. Here are the top seven milestones for African wildlife in 2015. By Deirdre Leowinata The U.S. Government listed…

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Are Fences the Solution for Protecting Africa’s National Parks?

With the expansion of human populations, instances of human-wildlife conflict become increasingly frequent. One proposed solution to protect both people and wildlife is the implementation of fences around established protected areas. Many conservation scientists argue that these fences may do more harm than good. A recent paper published in June by some of the world’s most renowned…

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Hard-Working Hands Span Cultures and Generations to Come Together for Big Cat Conservation

Education is the foundation for positive change, and every year the National Geographic Student Expeditions takes groups of high school students from around the world to beautiful places on quests for both knowledge and skills. The trips also serve as a way to help various developing communities, and this year two groups of students made…

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Africa’s Illegal Charcoal Trade Engulfs Cheetah Habitat

In rural northern Tanzania, an African country famous for charismatic megafauna, including free-roaming cheetah and other big cats, impoverished and under-employed Swahili villagers struggle to survive. One way to earn money and make cooking fuel is to cut forests for wood that can be turned into charcoal. It’s an economic and environmental disaster, illegal because…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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