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In recognition of their commitment to geographic education, 40 highly respected educators from the United States and Canada have been selected as the 12th group of Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Grosvenor Teacher Fellows. The 2018 Fellows will embark on global expeditions on board the Lindblad Expedition ships National Geographic Explorer, National Geographic Endeavour ll...

The National Geographic Society today announced that Andrew Revkin has joined the global nonprofit as strategic adviser for environmental and science journalism. Revkin is one of America’s most honored and experienced journalists focused on environmental and human sustainability and examining how new communication tools might foster progress on a finite, fast-changing planet. In his new role, Revkin will...

A group of 16- to 19-year-old students in Banbasa, India, will participate in National Geographic Photo Camp, March 22-27, 2018. National Geographic Photo Camp is a program that teaches young people from underserved communities, including at-risk and refugee teens, how to use photography to tell their own stories, explore the world around them and develop...

On February 15, in partnership with the National Audubon Society, BirdLife International and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the National Geographic Society hosted and livestreamedan event at the Society’s headquarters in Washington, D.C., featuring global thought leaders in the study and conservation of birds. The event is part of the Society’s efforts to mark the...

Today, the National Geographic Society, African Parks, the Wyss Foundation and the Republic of Benin announced a groundbreaking partnership to help secure and rehabilitate one of the last remaining wild landscapes in all of West Africa, Benin’s Pendjari National Park. Together, the four partners are initially committing more than US$23M to safeguard the park. African...

For 130 years, National Geographic has been using the power of photography to tell meaningful stories, inspire people to take action and transport audiences to unseen places. A new exhibition opening at the National Geographic Museum on Feb. 13, “Day to Night: In the Field with Stephen Wilkes,” takes that experience even further by showcasing...

From Jan. 9 – 12, the National Geographic Society welcomed renowned photographers for its annual Photography Seminar. The theme of this year’s seminar, “Photography for Change,” reflects the vital contributions photographers have made to National Geographic for almost 130 years as well as the increasingly critical role photography is playing in driving awareness, engagement and progress. Today, there are so many challenges facing our planet, from overpopulation and abuse of our natural resources, to rising geopolitical tensions and poverty. In an age of noise, distraction and speed, photography has an unparalleled ability to command our focus and attention and deliver clarity and truth that cannot be questioned, spun or ignored. Photography cuts through geographic, cultural and political barriers and unites people by creating a universal language of beauty, wonder, sorrow, and joy.

Photography shows us the infinite scale of our planet and universe. At the same time, it is profoundly personal, capturing human emotion in all its rawness and intimacy.

Photography provokes thought, changes perceptions, and evokes compassion.

And, perhaps most importantly, photography makes people take action.

Throughout the week, acclaimed National Geographic photographers including Michael “Nick” Nichols, David Doubilet, Maggie Steber, Ed Kashi, Paul Nicklen and Cristina Mittermeier filled the halls of National Geographic, sharing the power of photography to inspire meaningful action, empower new conservation movements, and make a measurable impact on our planet. These are a few of our favorite images from this powerful week.

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The National Geographic Society today announced the election of two new members to its Board of Trustees: business and marketing leader Beth Comstock and solar energy pioneer and entrepreneur Lyndon Rive. The announcement was made by Jean Case, chairman of the Board of Trustees, and Gary E. Knell, the Society’s president and chief executive officer. Comstock and Rive...

2018 marks the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the most powerful and important bird-protection law ever passed. In honor of this milestone, National Geographic, the National Audubon Society, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and BirdLife International will join forces with more than 100 other organizations and millions of people around the world to...

A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa supported by the National Geographic Society reveals the dire state of one of the planet’s most iconic big cats. In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ, researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa and population decline support a call...

The National Geographic Society Board of Trustees this week endorsed more than $4 million in grant funding, further strengthening the Society’s investment in the best in science, exploration, conservation, storytelling, education and technology. The 111 grants will help address the most critical issues facing our planet and ensure a healthier, more sustainable future for generations...

The National Geographic Society today announced the opening of registration for the 2017 Marine Protection Prize. The competition will source the best uses of technology and data collection to help combat illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing affecting island nations and coastal communities. In May 2018, the Society will award a share of $450,000 to...