fish

Fish Are Losing Their Sense of Smell

By Marlene Cimons There have been numerous wake-up calls about the effects of climate change on marine life. As ocean waters heat up, they are bleaching corals. Growing levels of carbon dioxide are acidifying seawater, which is degrading the shells and skeletons of sea organisms. The rising temperatures are prompting fish to migrate to colder waters, even causing them…

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Congress working to take fisheries backward 20 years

By Safina Center Staff It took the United States decades to develop and perfect an effective fisheries management plan that helps keep enough fish to feed both the nation’s people and its animals. The landmark legislation that turned around the country’s widespread overfishing problem was called the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, passed in…

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Cambodia: The Last Hope for Iconic Wildlife at the Brink?

The Mekong River is the 12th longest river in the world and the third most biodiverse river in terms of fish next to the Amazon and the Congo. It boasts the world’s largest inland fishery, providing food and livelihood for millions of people. It is a transboundary river that runs through six countries: China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam, and supports hundreds of extraordinary species –- from birds to mammals, reptiles, and fish. It is also important habitat and the last remaining stronghold for species at the brink of extinction, including the giant freshwater stingray, giant ibis, Siamese crocodile, and the Mekong giant catfish. Since it is a transboundary river, there is a need for people to work together for the effective conservation and management of the river ecosystem.

As part of National Geographic’s Mentorship Program, I had the chance to participate in a Workshop on Saving Species on the Edge of Extinction, co-organized by my mentor, Dr. Zeb Hogan. The workshop was part of the USAID-funded Wonders of the Mekong project, a joint initiative that seeks to understand and share the value of the Mekong River ecosystem….

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March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Professional big wave surfer Greg Long wiped out while…

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Streamers: A Win-Win for Seabirds and Fishermen

By Nicole Perman Until recently, it seemed as though the short-tailed albatross would not be able to escape extinction.  These endangered seabirds have been threatened first by hunting, and more recently by overfishing in the North Pacific and Bering Seas, and by their less-than-ideal primary breeding ground – a small volcanically active island called Tori-shima,…

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Before the Next Storm: Helping People and Nature Adapt

By Vera Agostini, Senior Marine Scientist, The Nature Conservancy Major hurricanes like Sandy (New Jersey in 2012) and Ivan (Eastern Caribbean in 2004) and Typhoon Haiyan (the Philippines 2013) make global headlines as they hit coastal communities, appropriately drawing attention to the human, financial, and community losses. While some smaller communities may not make global…

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Tackling Overfishing on Many Fronts

As the World Ocean Summit winds down in Half Moon Bay, California, this evening, much discussion among the hundreds of gathered delegates has turned to overfishing.  There were perhaps as many thoughts on the subject as members in attendance from the fishing industry, academia, conservation organizations, and the media. But, several solutions emerged that received…

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Can World Leaders Tame the Wild West of the High Seas?

Earlier this month, Indonesia announced the world’s largest sanctuary for manta rays. At the World Ocean Summit Tuesday, Peter Seligmann, the CEO of Conservation International, said the sanctuary “was not done out of good will, it was done out of enlightened self interest.” Seligmann said Indonesia had made careful calculations about how much manta rays…

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Year of the Horse Kicks Off with Seahorse Conservation

Dr. Tse-Lynn Loh, Postdoctoral Research Associate John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago in partnership with Project Seahorse (University of British Columbia & Zoological Society of London) I’m writing from foggy and drizzly Haiphong, where I’ve been meeting with our country hosts at the Research Institute for Marine Fisheries (RIMF) and organizing the logistics for the next…

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Voyage to the Central American Dome, the Forgotten Sea

By Erick Ross Salazar, MarViva MarViva Foundation and Mission Blue have teamed up to seek protection for a high seas “hope spot” called the Central American Dome (CAD). A term coined by Mission Blue founder Sylvia Earle, hope spots are areas of particular conservation concern beneath the waves. The Central American Dome is a biodiverse,…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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