freshwater species of the week

Iconic Ganges River Dolphin: Freshwater Species of the Week

  Conservation India reports that an endangered Ganges river dolphin (or Gangetic dolphin, Platanista gangetica gangetica), was killed by villagers in Assam this week. A fishmonger was seen selling the marine mammal’s meat at a roadside market in Lezai-Kalakhowa. The Ganges river dolphin is the national aquatic animal of India. It lives in the freshwater of the Ganges…

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Missing “Rain Frog” Resurfaces in Honduras: Freshwater Species of the Week

In 2008, National Geographic Young Explorer Jonathan Kolby re-discovered a frog species endemic to Honduras that had been declared extinct. The amphibian had vanished mysteriously in the mid 1980s. Now, the Australia-based Kolby told us via email, “I’ve been searching for more proof of its existence every year since, and finally found a second one a…

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New Electric Fish Found, Are Wired Differently

Scientists who found two new species of electric fish in the Amazon River were stunned to discover that the two animals are, well, wired much differently. Unlike their relative the electric eel, which can generate a charge of 600 volts, these weakly electric fish, called bluntnose knifefish, produce much smaller electric discharges. While electric eels use…

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New Electric Fish Found, Are Wired Differently

Scientists who found two new species of electric fish in the Amazon River were stunned to discover that the two animals are, well, wired much differently. Unlike their relative the electric eel, which can generate a charge of 600 volts, these weakly electric fish, called bluntnose knifefish, produce much smaller electric discharges. While electric eels use…

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Hellbenders Reintroduced in New York: Freshwater Species of the Week

The Eastern hellbender–also called a snot otter, devil dog, mud dog, grampus, or Allegheny alligator–is one of the world’s largest species of salamander. The animal, formally Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, has been declining and is officially listed as “near threatened” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Much larger than any other salamanders in their range, hellbenders…

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Hellbenders Reintroduced in New York: Freshwater Species of the Week

The Eastern hellbender–also called a snot otter, devil dog, mud dog, grampus, or Allegheny alligator–is one of the world’s largest species of salamander. The animal, formally Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, has been declining and is officially listed as “near threatened” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Much larger than any other salamanders in their range, hellbenders…

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Tiny Transmitters for Mountain Yellow-Legged Frogs: Freshwater Species of the Week

On Wednesday, Frank Santana, a researcher at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, released 65 froglets into a Southern California creek. The small amphibians represent new hope for an endangered species, the mountain yellow-legged frog. (We wrote about how specimens of this frog were refrigerated for preservation in 2010, part of the restoration…

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Tiny Transmitters for Mountain Yellow-Legged Frogs: Freshwater Species of the Week

On Wednesday, Frank Santana, a researcher at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, released 65 froglets into a Southern California creek. The small amphibians represent new hope for an endangered species, the mountain yellow-legged frog. (We wrote about how specimens of this frog were refrigerated for preservation in 2010, part of the restoration…

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Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

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Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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