Genographic Project

Testing the Genetic Diversity of College Students in New York City

Two-hundred university students trudged through the snowy New York City streets to swab their cheeks and trace their ancient ancestry with the Genographic Project on Monday evening at the American Museum of Natural History. Students from over eight local Universities were given the unique opportunity to test their DNA with the Geno 2.0 DNA Ancestry…

Read More

How Rare Am I? Genographic Project Results Demonstrate Our Extended Family Tree

Most participants of National Geographic’s Genographic Project can recite their haplogroup as readily as their mother’s maiden name. Yet outside consumer genetics, the word haplogroup is still unknown. Your haplogroup, or genetic branch of the human family tree, tells you about your deep ancestry—often thousands of years ago—and shows you the possible paths of migration…

Read More

Genetic Research in the Caribbean Goes Deeper Than DNA

Anthropological fieldwork and laboratory analysis have been at the core of the Genographic Project since its launch in 2005.  Working at that core are scientists from eleven regional research centers spread around the globe collaborating with local indigenous populations to gather and analyze genetic data. In addition to DNA sampling and analysis, learning about the…

Read More

The Genographic Project Returns to Ireland to Reveal DNA Results

By Colby Bishop, The Genographic Project Hundreds of County Mayo, Ireland residents gathered earlier this week to learn first hand what their DNA could show them about their ancient past. From Viking ancestry to descending from Niall of the Nine Hostages, the genetics of County Mayo proved intriguing, reaching far beyond Guinness and the rolling…

Read More

Ötzi the Iceman Leads a Wave of Genetics Buzz

The popularity of recent news reports on the DNA of the mummy Ötzi remind us that genetic breakthroughs are reaching far beyond white-lab-coat laboratories. Right now, the cost of DNA testing is affordable, genetic research is growing exponentially, and finally—legally speaking—your DNA is yours. Will 2013 be remembered as the year that genetics went main stream?…

Read More

Ötzi the Iceman Leads a Wave of Genetics Buzz

The popularity of recent news reports on the DNA of the mummy Ötzi remind us that genetic breakthroughs are reaching far beyond white-lab-coat laboratories. Right now, the cost of DNA testing is affordable, genetic research is growing exponentially, and finally—legally speaking—your DNA is yours. Will 2013 be remembered as the year that genetics went main stream?…

Read More

The Genographic Project Explores the Ancient History of Guam

The name Micronesia, meaning small islands, describes the region well since most of these are small atolls, less than 80 square miles. I’m among the beautiful Marianas islands of western Micronesia, more specifically in Guam to meet the Chamorro people, and to see if together we could unlock some of the mysteries hidden in their DNA….

Read More

The Genographic Project Explores the Ancient History of Guam

The name Micronesia, meaning small islands, describes the region well since most of these are small atolls, less than 80 square miles. I’m among the beautiful Marianas islands of western Micronesia, more specifically in Guam to meet the Chamorro people, and to see if together we could unlock some of the mysteries hidden in their DNA….

Read More

Europe’s Early Settlers Uncovered

Europe’s Stone Age settlers migrated in waves that replaced older hunter-gatherer cultures, suggests a study that looks at European DNA, both ancient and modern. The results reported in the journal, Science, answer questions about the peopling of modern-day Europe. Some of our ancestors hunted wild animals and gathered plants to survive, while others were discovering agriculture, and…

Read More

What’s in Your Genes? Join a Twitter Chat with Geneticist Spencer Wells

When National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Robert Ballard, best known for his discovery of the R.M.S. Titanic, first participated in the Genographic Project, he expected to confirm what he already knew of his British-Dutch ancestry. But could his DNA tell him more about his ancient relatives? Dr. Ballard decided to “swab” with National Geographic’s Genographic Project to…

Read More

What’s in Your Genes? Join a Twitter Chat with Geneticist Spencer Wells

When National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Robert Ballard, best known for his discovery of the R.M.S. Titanic, first participated in the Genographic Project, he expected to confirm what he already knew of his British-Dutch ancestry. But could his DNA tell him more about his ancient relatives? Dr. Ballard decided to “swab” with National Geographic’s Genographic Project to…

Read More

Gathering Irish Genes

2013 is a big year for Ireland. The Emerald Isle is calling her people home for a celebration of all things Irish in a year-long program, The Gathering: Ireland 2013.  Featuring everything from music festivals to Guinness World Record competitions (check out the Town of 1000 Beards gathering), the event marks the biggest tourism initiative ever…

Read More

About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

Social Media