Guest Blogger

Community Water Systems on the Rise

Caption: The Latin American Confederation of Water and Sanitation Community Organizations (CLOCSAS), recently celebrated eight years of protecting and strengthening community water systems that serve millions of urban and rural water drinkers. By Daniel Moss Water providers, essential to quenching our daily thirst, usually aren’t household names, their logo swooshed across a baseball cap. If…

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Of Dinosaur Pee and Aquifer Re-injection: Dilemmas in Water Reuse

By Daniel Moss

Thirsting for solutions to an exploding water crisis, there’s much talk about water reuse. At a recent conference of Mexican water distributors, two starkly different strategies were on display. In one scenario – causing some noses to wrinkle – consumers are asked to drink chemically-treated wastewater that has been re-injected into aquifers. In the other, they slake their thirst on water that’s been used, but generally only by ecosystems filtering water over time. Conjuring up prehistory, International Water Association Board Member Daniel Nolasco, described this re-used water as “dinosaur pee”….

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Community Water Systems on the Rise

Water providers, essential to quenching our daily thirst, usually aren’t household names, their logo swooshed across a baseball cap. If we think of them at all, it might be a big city utility. And yet, many urban neighborhoods, and vast stretches of rural areas, are served by tiny, often invisible community operators. In Latin America alone, over 145,000 small community operators serve 70,000,000 people. They are making good – or at least trying to – on the human right to water and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals….

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Fossils and Taboos: What to expect when doing paleontological fieldworks in Madagascar

By Tsiory Andrianavalona

Nosy Makamby is a gem for paleontologists working on Miocene sedimentary formations in Madagascar. This small island is geologically rich, its sedimentary layers are very fossiliferous, and our discoveries until now are very encouraging. The proximity of the sea also brings in fresh breezes which are very welcome under the hot sun of August. I do love my job–it allows me to work with amazing teammates and discover my country from North to South. As a scientist, I tend to be objective and rational, but through my paleontological field experiences, I was exposed more than once to unusual situations that are tightly tied to people’s beliefs….

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Wildfires, Mudslides in the Wake of Climate Change

“Enviromedics: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health” by Jay Lemery, MD and Paul Auerbach, MD was published this past October by Rowman & Littlefield. We asked Dr. Auerbach of Stanford University to comment on the aftermath of the recent wildfires in California. By Paul Auerbach The destruction from the wildfires in California (and…

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Gilbert Thompson, Lying Bob, and the Ballad of Croppy the Mule

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary, this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins The story, as he liked to tell…

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Almon Thompson: The Self-Taught Cartographer Who Helped Found National Geographic

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins Almon Thompson didn’t set out to…

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Lighting the Way

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. One of our least-known founders, Herbert Gouverneur Ogden, was long…

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How America’s Leading Hydrographer Helped Found The National Geographic Society

The thirty-three founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group.  They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo.  In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s recent 130th anniversary, this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins Despite appearances—he “continued to dress in the…

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Clarence Dutton: Poet of the Grand Canyon

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins An army captain with a soldierly…

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Traveling the World to Study Its Waters

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins For being related to such a…

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A Historic Journey Into Death Valley

The 33 founders of the National Geographic Society were an adventurous and accomplished group. They included scientists, explorers, a journalist and a superintendent of the National Zoo. In recognition of the National Geographic Society’s upcoming 130th anniversary this series takes a look at their stories. By Mark Collins Jenkins When he was 12-years-old, Rogers Birnie…

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About the Blog

Researchers, conservationists, and others share stories, insights and ideas about Our Changing Planet, Wildlife & Wild Spaces, and The Human Journey. More than 50,000 comments have been added to 10,000 posts. Explore the list alongside to dive deeper into some of the most popular categories of the National Geographic Society’s conversation platform Voices.

Opinions are those of the blogger and/or the blogger’s organization, and not necessarily those of the National Geographic Society. Posters of blogs and comments are required to observe National Geographic’s community rules and other terms of service.

Voices director: David Braun (dbraun@ngs.org)

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