Jer Thorp

Sitting in a submersible 650 meters beneath the ocean  is a surprisingly serene experience. The pitch and roll that you feel at the surface disappears moments after you’ve submerged, and from then on you exist in a sphere of perfect stability. When the sub reaches the bottom, the pilot adjusts to a neutral buoyancy so…

Changing Planet

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The graphic above is a visualization of more than 4,700 of the submersible Alvin‘s dives, over the last 5 decades (click it to view a larger version). I made it to get a better understanding of what a ‘typical’ Alvin dive might be—as you can see, there turned out to be quite a range. While…

Changing Planet

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Alvin is almost certainly the world’s most famous submersible. For 50 years, this little sub-that-could has been plunging into some of the deepest parts of the world’s oceans, carrying researchers to depths of more than 4,000 meters* to perform a myriad of scientific and non-scientific tasks. Alvin has recovered a stray hydrogen bomb from the bottom of the…

Changing Planet

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