Los Alamos National Laboratory

Stemming the spread of HIV by accurately predicting its spread

By Thomas Leitner, Ph.D. One of the challenges with stemming the spread of HIV lies in understanding how it is spread. Because HIV mutates so rapidly, it has historically been difficult—if not impossible—to trace exactly who transmitted ...

Going with the gut

By Anand Kumar, D.V.M., Ph.D. A new gut bacteria cocktail could transform our approach to chronic disease If all disease begins in the gut, as Hippocrates declared more than 2,000 years ago, then surely the cures for those ...

Forecasting diseases one image at a time

An image from a Landsat satellite of Brazil, where the Amazon flows into the Rio Negro and Solimoes River. Satellite imagery like this will be coupled with epidemiological data, meteorological data, and Internet data streams to identify conditions that could ...

Fighting tuberculosis with faster, more accurate diagnostics

By Harshini Mukundan Around the world, tuberculosis is making a comeback, owing to the increased incidence of HIV/AIDS and several other factors. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), between 1900 and 2015, the incidence of new TB cases increased nearly 40 ...

Unique imaging of a dinosaur’s skull tells evolutionary tale

Researchers have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast. Using Los Alamos National Laboratory’s unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities, researchers have exposed the inner structures of the fossil ...

Using machine-learning to scan the sky

By Spencer Johnson If you watch the night sky for a while, you’ll start to notice changes. Meteors streak by, the International Space Station glides over in silence, an airplane blinks overhead. Among these celestial transients, less noticeable but ...

What Martian ‘halos’ tell us about habitability

Migrating silica reveals liquid water lingered longer on Red Planet Lighter-toned bedrock that surrounds fractures and comprises high concentrations of silica—called “halos”—has been found in Gale crater on Mars, indicating that the planet had liquid water much longer ...

Unraveling the mysteries of lightning

By Tess Lavezzi Light When thunderstorm season rolls around and lightning streaks the sky, we likely don’t ponder the mysteries it presents. Lightning seems to be one of those things we’ve got figured out. Didn’t we learn ...

Confessions of a dark matter detective

Using an observatory made of giant water barrels, particle astrophysicist Andrea Albert hopes to find the gamma-ray tracks leading back to their WIMP-y source. By Andrea Albert Fourteen thousand feet above sea level near a volcanic peak in Mexico sits ...